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Laurel and Hardy - Ulverston

Stan Laurel – Ulverston

Reading Time: < 1 minute Stan’s Home: Stan Laurel was born in Ulverston, Cumbria on 16th June 1890 at his grand parents’ house at 3 Argyle Street. The property is still there to this day and proudly displays a plaque at the front stating the fact that Stan was born there. In April 2021, the property was put up for sale by the owner. Furthermore, the family would like to property to be bought by a fan of the comedy legend. Visitors travel from around the world to see the three-bedroom terraced property, including two visits from Stan’s daughter, Lois, from America. Stan died in in 1965 aged 74 and his ashes interred at Los Angeles cemetery. Stan and Ollie’s Statue: This bronze statue of Stan and Ollie takes pride of place outside the Coronation Hall in the town. Now that the dark nights are here, the statue looks wonderful illuminated by the gas lamp. Laurel and Hardy Museum: Close by in Brogden Street is the Laurel and Hardy Museum. Here you can browse an eccentric showcase of hat, beer bottles, props, photos and press cuttings of the pair. There is also a constant screening of Laurel and Hardy films in the 1920s-style cinema. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Foulshaw Moss Nature Reservee

Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve

Reading Time: < 1 minute Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve near Grange-over-Sands. Each year a pair of breeding Ospreys return to South Cumbria to raise their chicks. So far, they have raised 18 chicks since 2014. Last Friday, they returned again and hopefully they will be successful this year. During the 18th Century, due to persecution from taxidermists, egg collectors and considered vermin by some, breeding ospreys almost became extinct. They slowly began to re-establish themselves naturally during the 1850s in Scotland. Consequently, it was a very slow process in expanding to new areas outside Scotland due to their preference of returning to breed close to where they fledged. In England, it was a different story completely as no ospreys had called the country home for decades. Nonetheless, conservationists set about restoring their natural habitat including building nesting platforms around wetlands such as Foulshaw Moss. The platforms had to be built to make them look as authentic as possible as ospreys preference is to use a pre-used nest. Due to the wonderful work of the Cumbria Wildlife Trust, a pair of ospreys have returned to Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve since 2014 and have so far successfully raised 18 chicks. The pair of ospreys are called White YW and Blue 35. You can watch the Ospreys on the Foulshaw Moss webcam here: https://www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife/cams/osprey-cam We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dove Cottage

I wandered lonely as a cloud

Reading Time: 2 minutes I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud: Come and ‘wander lonely as a cloud’ and explore Cumbria’s literary heritage with a stay Lothlorien. From your base in Kents Bank, just outside Grange-over-Sands, you can easily visit the homes of some of the country’s most celebrated writers. In less than an hour, you can visit Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top, William Wordsworth’s Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage and John Ruskin’s Brantwood (below). In addition, whilst you’re on the east side of Coniston you can connect with another famous author from the area – Arthur Ransome. Furthermore, visiting these literary hot spots, you can also take in the beauty of the lakes such as: Windermere Windermere is not only the largest lake in England it is also one of the most beautiful. The shores of the southern reaches are wooded with hardwoods. Dominating the northern reaches are the imposing craggy mountains of the central lakes. Coniston Coniston village has almost as dramatic setting as Keswick. It is beautifully placed at the foot of the Old Man and Yewdale Crags and half a mile from the head of the lake.  There are mines and quarries almost the whole way up the Old Man of Coniston. Coniston Lake is a little over 5 miles long. Rydal Water Rydal is a modest little lake set in reeds between the crags of Nab Scar to the north and Loughrigg Fell to the south. The lake is only 17m. deep and is the first lake to freeze over in a cold spell. For the most part, well-maintained lake-side paths take you around the lake to Loughrigg Terrace above Grasmere lake. Grasmere Grasmere is a combination of lake, small dale and village and thought to be quintessence of a typical Lakeland landscape. In particular, William Wordsworth thought so too and made the village his home. Additionally, this delightful lake is completely surrounded by public access land owned by the National Trust. The walk around Rydal Water and Grasmere lake are one of the most trodden in the Lake District. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Sandscale Haws

Sandscale Haws – Roanhead

Reading Time: < 1 minute Sandscale Haws – Roanhead Sandscale Haws National Trust Reserve is an outstanding coastal dune habitat situated on the Duddon Estuary near Barrow-in-Furness. There are wonderful views overlooking the stunning Lakeland Fells. Furthermore, it is home to some unique wildlife home to a unique range of fauna. The Roanhead area is also a refuge to the rare natterjack toad where it can found in sandy places. They tend to dig burrows in soft sand dunes and breed in shallow pools. A number of characteristics differentiate the natterjack from the common toad. Notably, it is the yellow line down the middle of the natterjacks back. Additionally, the natterjack is smaller and more olive-green in colour, with shinier and smoother skin. Natterjack toads are protected in the UK under Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is illegal to disturb them or handle them without a licence. To sum up, populations are declining nationally, and beyond the north-west and Solway coasts, natterjacks cling on at just a handful of dunes in East Anglia and on sandy heaths in Surrey and Hampshire. Furthermore this stunning area is home to greater crested newts, butterflies and dune pansies. In winter it is home to thousands of migratory waders and wildfowl and the coastal habitats are of international importance for wildlife. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Donald Campbell

Donald Campbell CBE

Reading Time: < 1 minute Donald Campbell CBE The centenary of the renowned speed record breaker Donald Campbell’s birth will be on March 23rd 2021. Donald Campbell broke eight world records on water and on land in the 1950s and 1960s. Coniston played host to four of his water speed triumphs. Furthermore, he remains the only person to have set both a land and water record in the same year 1964. Campbell was awarded the CBE in 1957 for his record-breaking speed-runs. Tragically, on January 4th 1967, the 46-year old died. His boat crashed while attempting to break the 300mph barrier and his own personal water speed record. He was only 200 yards from the end of the second leg when his boat – Bluebird K7 catapulted into the air after its nose lifted on the second leg of his attempt. Consequently, it wasn’t until 2001 that his body and Bluebird were eventually found. A team led by diver Bill Smith recovered the wreckage. He was laid to rest in Coniston cemetery. He was posthumously awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct in 1967. As a result of his exploits, Donald Malcom Campbell is known as Coniston’s adopted son. To celebrate his centenary, a year-long programme of events around the Coniston area are planned. Furthermore, to start with, a pair of fighter planes paid tribute on March 23rd 2021 by flying over Coniston and dipping in salute as they roared overhead. The RAF Hawks were replicating a manoeuvre carried out by a Vulcan bomber on the day after his death in 1967. Finally, Coniston is, and will always be, Donald Campbell’s spititual home. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dog Friendly Cottage

Grange Dog Friendly Holiday Cottage

Reading Time: < 1 minute Grange Dog Friendly Holiday Cottage: Dogs love Cumbria so don’t leave your four-legged friend at home. There is so much to see and do in Grange-over-Sands and Cartmel. Furthermore, the Lake District  (right on our doorstep) is a perfect place to get outdoors and explore this beautiful area with your best friend. Here at Lothlorien we are pet friendly and love well-behaved pets. We have a large enclosed garden and plenty of super walks in the area. You’d be ‘barking’ to miss out on a break in this special place. Click below to book your stay.    We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Piel Island

Piel Island – Cumbria

Reading Time: < 1 minute Piel Island – Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria: This quiet and seemingly remote island is about a mile off the shore of Walney Island close to Barrow in Furness. The island was once under the control of the monks of nearby Furness Abbey. This 52-acre stretch of shingle beach and wildflower scrubland is without electricity and only one permanent resident, the ‘King’ of Piel. Steve Chattaway, who is the landlord of the 17th-century Ship Inn, was crowned King in a ceremony in July 2008. This fascinating island also boasts a ruined 14th-century castle and camp site. If you visit with children you can spend many happy hours playing on the beach or collecting shells. Additionally, you can try to spot seals at the water’s edge. At low tide you can walk out to Piel Island from Walney or catch the Piel Island ferry from Roa Island. Incidentally, the ferry price is reasonable (at around five pounds each) and takes a few minutes to cross the Piel Channel. Finally, if you drive along the scenic coast road from Ulverston, you will experience the beauty of the Furness peninsula. Finally, travel time by car from Lothlorien is about 45 minutes. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside Viaduct - Spectacular Engineering

Arnside Viaduct – Spectacular Engineering

Reading Time: < 1 minute Arnside Viaduct – Spectacular Engineering: Arnside Viaduct was built in 1857 across the Kent Estuary linking the Furness Railway to Barrow-in-Furness (then a new iron town), with the main London line at Carnforth junction. Additionally, in 1876, a branch line opened going eastwards to Sandside, Heversham and Hincaster. The majority of the branch line closed in 1942. The viaduct has a total of 50 piers, and is 522 yards long. By building the viaduct, it barred access to Westmorland’s only seaport close to Milnthorpe. The port area was at Sandside, roughly a mile from Milnthorpe.   Sandside had its own customs officer who saw that taxes were paid on any imported goods. Today, the only evidence of the port is a little piece of wharf now used as a car park. Consequently, the land around the Kingfisher restaurant up to the Ship Inn would likely have been used by the port’s merchants.   At one time there were ten pubs in the Sandside area and the place had a reputation for being rough. Coal was a major import into the port. Furthermore in Milnthorpe, had a wine merchant’s with premises in the square where the Spar shop once was. In addition, the east-west road through Milnthorpe to Crooklands would have been a lot busier back with merchants. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Charcoal Man Sculpture

Charcoal Man Sculpture

Reading Time: < 1 minute Charcoal Man Sculpture: This beautiful sculpture sits in the woods near High Dam, near Finsthwaite in Cumbria. The charcoal man sculpture commemorates the charcoal burning industry carried out in the wood since the building of Furness Abbey in the 12th century. Charcoal was a vital component in the iron smelting process. The sculpture sits within the remains of a bark peelers hut. Bark, particularly oak, has been used for centuries in leather tanning. Bark peelers constructed tepee like huts on a circular stone wall with a chimney at the back. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Walney Channel

Walney Channel and Bridge

Reading Time: < 1 minute Walney Channel and Bridge: For those who don’t know the Furness Peninsula, Walney  Channel separates Barrow-in-Furness from Walney Island. The Duddon river flows from the north into the channel from the Estuary and south out into Morecambe Bay. Additionally, the channel is regularly dredged to give shipping access to the Port of Barrow. The Channel Bridge In 1908, due to the expanding population of Walney, a bridge was constructed. The bridge was needed to replace the steam ferry which started service on May 27th 1878. It had to be an opening bridge to allow the passage of shipping up the channel to some of the docks. The bridge opened on July 30th 1908 at a cost of £175,000. It operated as a toll bridge until 1935. This is the original ferry crossing point between Walney Island and the mainland which ran until the 1940s. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cycling in the Lake District

Cycling in the Lake District

Reading Time: 2 minutes Cycling in the Lake District: Cumbria and the Lake District is definitely made for cycling.. From the Morecambe Bay cycle route to more challenging off-road mountain biking to gentle country lanes that are all here on the doorstep of Lothlorien. The Grizedale and Whinlatter forests offer man-made off-road trails. Grizedale’s trail will take you through the forest by way of a winding single-track, which offers leg burning climbs and adrenalin fuelled descents. If that is not enough, there are lots of rewarding views and many bridleways to extend your route. Whinlatter Forest is home to the longest purpose-built mountain bike trail in the Lake District. The forest offers stunning views, fantastic walks, exhilarating mountain biking and rare wildlife. If you prefer a longer more gentle route to appreciate the scenery, the Hadrian’s Wall UNESCO World Heritage site is further north in the county. For younger cyclists, Allithwaite (only a mile away) has its own pump track where you can cycle free of charge. The South Lakes is home to the UK’s largest cycle store (Wheelbase) nearby Kentmere near Staveley which is approximately 15 miles away. Here at Lothlorien, we offer: Free secure well-lit cycle storage for the duration of your stay. Information on local cycle trails and routes Sockets for phone or E-Bike charging Information on local attractions Bike washing facilities if required Free use of workshop if required Find out more about  a cycling holiday in Cumbria. Click here: Cycle Cumbria We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks

3 Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks

Reading Time: 2 minutes Here are 3 Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks: Cumbria contains a wealth of wonderful woods in beautiful settings. Many of these woods are Woodland Trust woods offering fantastic walks with much to see and explore, both in the woods themselves and in the wider landscape. The idea of spending time in outdoor natural spaces and a desire to experience nature could be key to improving your wellbeing. A walk in the woods is rewarding at any time of the year. 1. Grubbins Wood Grubbins Wood is a hidden gem lying close to the foreshore between Arnside and New Barns Bay. The clear uninterupted shore of the Kent Estuary, where noisy waders feast in the mud, contrasts with the shade of the ancient yew woodland. Away from the stands of yew, Lancastrian whitebeam clings to the ramparts along the shore. This incredibly rare tree, which is full of red berries in the autumn, is only found in limestone outcrops around Morecambe Bay. 2. Moss & Height Spring Wood Moss & Height Spring Wood is managed as one wood but with two distinct areas – Moss Wood and Height Spring Wood. This lush wood, divided by an old coffin road now a public byway), lies within the beautiful Rusland Valley. The flood plain of Rusland Pool has wet mosses and pastures alive with dragonflies and wild flowers. The valley sides are cloaked in ancient deciduous woodland and the views to the fells beyond are spectacular. The area has the feeling of remoteness but with the advantages of a network of footpaths, small villages, a pub and seasonal tearoom at nearby Bouth. 3. Beckmickle Ing, Staveley Beckmickle Ing is part of a well-wooded area on the east bank of the River Kent near Staveley in the Lake District National Park. The walk takes in the beauty of deciduous woodland, with riverside interest and flower-rich grassland, including part of the Dales way. There are excellent public transport links to Staveley as well as toilets and refreshments in the village. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lakes Aquarium

Watery World At Lakes Aquarium

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Watery World At Lakes Aquarium: Lakeside is 2 miles north from Newby Bridge at the southern end of  Windermere. It has a large hotel – ‘The Lakeside Hotel’ – and a   bustling railway station for the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway. It is also the most southerly terminus for the Windermere Cruise boats from Bowness and Ambleside. Furthermore, right next door to the station is the Lakes Aquarium. The aquarium explores the amazing underwater watery world, ranging from Africa through to Morecambe Bay. Additionally, along with the usual fishy inhabitants, the aquarium is home to a boa constrictor, a family of marmosets and a pair of short-clawed otters. Undoubtedly, the highlight though is the underwater tunnel. The tunnel simulates a trip deep beneath Windermere’s surface, complete with carp, char and diving ducks. Joint tickets to include a Windermere cruise or a trip on a steam train on the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway are available to purchase. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Windermere Lake Cruises

Lakeside Windermere Ferries

Reading Time: 2 minutes During the winter months at Lakeside, the boats belonging to Windermere Lake Cruises are taken out of service for their marine equivalent of an MoT. Once the boats are out of the water their hulls are power washed to remove the green algae that has accumulated over the summer months. After that, the deck boards are removed, and the vessels  made available for inspection by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Their surveyor goes over the vessels with a fine toothcomb. They check everything from the bilges and hull to the engines and steering to ensure everything is shipshape for the coming season. Carrying out the winter maintenance programme is a responsible job. The same people who sail the thousands of visitors on Windermere complete the winter maintenance. Moreover, the captains and mate engineers sail the 17 vessels through the summer months repair them in the winter. The summer months see the wearing their uniforms and winter their boilersuits. The big four -Teal, Swan, Tern and the new Swift- can only come out of the water at Lakeside near Newby Bridge. Their smaller vessels dock at the company’s Ambleside boat yard for repairs. At the moment, one of Windermere Lake Cruises’ most iconic vessels (pictured) is having a brand new bridge fitted. The current bridge has been in place for the last 30 years. Once repaired and back in the water the boats operate for 364 days a year. Only on a handful of occasions that atrocious weather makes it unsafe to sail. On average the company loses 3-4 days per year due to poor weather. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Helvellyn Landing

Helvellyn -The Sky’s Not The Limit

Reading Time: 2 minutes Helvellyn -The Sky’s Not The Limit: Helvellyn is the third-highest mountain both in England and in the Lake District. Access to it is easier than to the two higher peaks of Scafell Pike and Sca Fell. The scenery includes three deep glacial coves, including Red Tarn, and two sharp-topped ridges on the eastern side (Striding Edge and Swirral Edge). Helvellyn was one of the earliest fells to prove popular with walkers and explorers, especially in the later 18th century. Among the early visitors to Helvellyn were the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, both of whom lived nearby at one period. Most visitors enjoying a Lakeland holiday at Lothlorien will be aware of Helvellyn. However, few will know about one of the most daring and spectacular events in its history when a biplane landed on its summit in 1926. Despite attempts on the 15th and 21st of December being abandoned, a small aeroplane landed on the summit plateau of Helvellyn and took off again on the 22nd. The two-seater biplane was an Avro 585 Gosport, was flown by Bert Hinkler. He was accompanied on the flight by John F. Leeming, president of the Lancashire Aero Club. The landing on the steep slope was successful due to a strong headwind helping stop the plane extremely quickly. However, the uphill take-off was incredibly difficult and the plane nosedived off the edge of the summit with inadequate airspeed, narrowly missing the treacherous Striding Edge before returning to Manchester. Additionally, after landing the biplane, the pilot asked a witness on the ground, Professor E. R. Dodds, to sign a paper stating he witnessed the landing. Consequently, he then took off and returned to the aerodrome in Woodford. Commemorative Plaque: There is an engraved stone tablet on Helvellyn’s summit, 40 yards south of the shelter. The tablet commemorates this unprecedented and to date unrepeated publicity stunt. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Grange-over-Sands

A Grange-over-Sands Holiday?

Reading Time: 2 minutes A Grange-over-Sands Holiday? Early days Following the arrival of the railway in 1857, Grange suddenly underwent a complete transformation. Virtually overnight the area grew up from a few scattered cottages, to become one of the most popular Victorian seaside resorts of its time. Grange finds itself sheltered from the cold winds by the broad, wooded backdrop of Hampsfell. People found the mild, dry climate much to their liking. Arrival of tourism Large hotels, schools, ornamental parks and the parish church were all built during this period. Furthermore, numerous guest houses sprang up almost everywhere, in a frenzied attempt to cater for the sudden boom in mass tourism. As many as 40,000 visitors would flock to the town. Most arrived by rail, along the line considered one of the most scenic routes in Britain. The majority of visitors would come during the summer bathing season. In addition, some visitors would vary their stay to take advantage of the year round equable climate and savour the medicinal qualities of the local spring water. Mentioned in a brochure at the time, Grange was described being the ‘loveliest spot on the Lakeland Coast’. One inevitable result of the railway preceding the town is that is acted as a barrier to the sea. Moreover, the line effectively limited the growth of large scale developments that has blighted other resorts. The mile long promenade was built as an afterthought in 1902. It quickly became popular with its affinity with the open waters of Morecambe Bay. Unfortunately, not long afterwards, an accelerated process of silting up occurred out across the Sands. Due to the silting, it eventually, became too shallow for the ferries and private yachts to negotiate. The towns heyday has long since gone, but the overall effect of the water as it sweeps across the whole bay is still there. Fishing The local fishermen still continue the traditions handed down over many generations. Although the fishing industry has slowly declined over recent years, the cockles, muscles, shrimps and fluke are generally considered to be without equal. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Castle Rigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle Keswick

Reading Time: < 1 minute Castlerigg Stone Circle (also known as the Keswick Circle) is a Neolithic stone circle about 1.5 miles east of Keswick. To get there take the Penrith Road from Keswick and take the first branch road then a right up a narrow lane. It is estimated to have been built around 4,500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settled on the fertile regions fringing the Lakeland mountains. The site was carefully chosen to impress and to draw upon the natural drama provided by the surrounding fells. Additionally, it is thought the circles were probably used as places of worship. The Castlerigg circle is differently places to the other stone circles in the county. The others generally occur on high land, the Cumbria coast and the Eden Valley. Furthermore, Keswick’s circle is in the fell centre and its setting very much adds to the drama. Apparently, its tallest stones line up with the sunrise over High Rigg at Candlemass in February and with the setting sun at Skiddaw at Summer Solstice. The Castleriggs circle is slightly oval. There remain forty-eight stones, some of the quite bulky, and on the east side is an unexplained and unusual oblong ‘chamber’ within the circle. 3 more places you may like to visit nearby; Bowder Stone Millican Dalton’s Cave Ashness Bridge We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lindale Village

Lindale

Reading Time: 2 minutes Lindale is close to the River Winster on the old Lancashire and Westmorland border. St Paul’s church along with the local pub, The Royal Oak, are situated at the top of the hill overlooking Lindale. The church was designed by the Kendal architect, George Webster (1797-1864). It is believed Lindale has had a place of worship in the village since 1577. Unfortunately, due to dwindling congregation numbers and increased maintenance costs the church has had to close. It held its final service on 25th January 2019.  Rev. George Wilson took the last service. John Wilkinson, the ironmaster, is buried in St Paul’s churchyard, in an unmarked grave; it was his fifth burial! Firstly, his coffin became lost on the sands of Morecambe Bay, but subsequently recovered. Secondly, an attempt to temporarily lay him to rest in the grounds of Castlehead, his former home, as a larger iron coffin was made – the original one was too small. Thirdly, the gravediggers hit rock, so the grave was too shallow and he was later buried deeper. Castlehead subsequently changed hands, and the new owners objected to the grave and the memorial above it. Consequently, the memorial now stands on the Lindale junction to Grange-over Sands and John Wilkinson’s final resting place was in the village churchyard. Finally, and unusually, for a village of this size, there are three large car showrooms. Hadwins Volkswagen Lake District Audi Lloyd South Lakes MINI We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cartmel Fell School And The Worn Rock Slide

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Parish Hall (pictured) on Cartmel Fell was once the school but closed in 1971 due to the falling number of pupils. Opposite the hall you will see a rock slide, warn smooth by countless children down the years (see photo below). When the school was built in 1871, it was very modern, with a high ceiling and large windows set above eye level to avoid distracting the pupils’ attention. Until the new school was built, children attended lessons in the church. To this day, in the Cowmire box pew, carved grid patterns can be seen on the seats which are probably methods of teaching children fractions. In 1971, Cartmel Fell school became unviable due to falling puypil numbers and was closed. It now used as a parish hall. It is now used for the W.I meetings, flower festivals, dances and other social activities. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Rampside Needle

Rampside Needle Lighthouse

Reading Time: < 1 minute Rampside Needle: This tall slim lighthouse is situated at Rampside close to Barrow-in Furness. It is known locally as the Rampside Needle and can be seen easily for Piel Island nearby. Built in the 1875, it is the only surviving example of 13 such beacons erected around Barrow to guide vessels into the port. It is 20 metres (66ft) tall and built of red and yellow bricks. This distinctive elegant landmark is set south-east of Barrow-in-Furness just off Roa Island Road. Rampside Lighthouse is Grade II designated building by English Heritage. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Millican Dalton's Cave

The Amazing Story of Millican Dalton

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Amazing Story of Millican Dalton: Millican Dalton was born in Nenthead, Alston, Cumberland, on 20 April 1867. He was known as the cavemand of Borrowdale. He spent his early life in the northwest of England before his family relocated to Essex. Earning a living as an insurance clerk in London, he lived in Loughton where he had a cottage. By the age of 36, gave up this existence and went to live in a cave in Borrowdale. Undoubtedly, he was decades ahead of his time, Millican Dalton – vegetarian, pacifist and teetotaller. Furthermore he  lived off his wits, surviving on a modest income as a climbing instructor. “Dalton’s Cave”, as it is known locally, is on the east face of Castle Crag. It comprises two inter-connected split-levelled caves left over from the slate quarrying industry.  He inhabited for almost fifty years. As a result, and to this day, Dalton’s legacy can be seen in the upper chamber of the cave, where he etched an epitaph into the wall… “Don’t Waste Words, Jump to Conclusions”. Whilst conducting his camping excursions he enjoyed campfire conversations and was always ready to pitch in an opinion on the great ideas of the day. Additionally, visitors often spoke of a sense of peace and relaxation after spending time with Millican. Embracing the solitude of his cave, he became attuned to the nature around him. It was during an interview with a newspaper in 1941, he commented, “Well, I don’t sleep much, and while I am awake I lie and listen and think. There’s a lot to think about just now, isn’t there? All the sounds of the nights, the roar of the mountain stream, the barking of our dogs and foxes, the cries of birds, how can I be lonely with such company?” Finally: Another interesting places to explore is the Bowder Stone. Visitors to Lothlorien are welcome to use the free WiFi to plan the best route to this fascinating location by visiting www.keswick.org We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cartmel Gatehouse

Cartmel Gatehouse

Reading Time: < 1 minute Cartmel Gatehouse: The Gatehouse in Cartmel, near Grange-over-Sands dates back from the 14th century. Over the years, it has housed the school and for many years the local court. Following restoration in 1922, the building was gifted to the National Trust. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside’s Old Walls – 15c Pele Tower

Reading Time: < 1 minute Arnside Tower House is located over in Far Arnside and was built close to the old agricultural and fishing community. It was originally referred to as Heathwaite. The Tower is believed to date back to 1375 and was built to offer protection against Scottish raids. The building burned down in October 1602, and was subsequently rebuilt. In 1884, a hurricane blew down the south-west wall. Today the ruins of the 15th Century Pele Tower are in a sorry state. Fortunately, there is enough still standing to get an idea of the imposing structure it would have been 500 years ago. It is actually private property and illegal to enter it (not to mention quite dangerous) but you can get right up close to the outside for some nice pictures and a bit of close up investigation. If you walk a little bit down the hill, where the defensive ditches are, there is the abandoned entrance to a tunnel.    We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Romney's Kendal Mint Cake

Kendal Mint Cake – A Top of the World Recipe

Reading Time: < 1 minute The No1 Top of the World Treat: Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay ate Romney’s Kendal mint cake on the summit of Mount Everest on 29th May 1953. This being the first successful expedition to the summit. Romney’s were approached by the 1953 expedition to Everest, to see whether they could supply Mint haste. Fortunately, they had sufficient stock to meet their needs, and the staff willingly gave up their sweet ration coupons to comply with the law. Sir Edmond Hilary and Sirdar Tenzing ate this Mint Cake on top of Everest as they gazed at the countryside below them. Mint Cake is still made to this day in Kendal by three different companies. However, the mint cake creation was apparently an accident! A confectioner called Joseph Wiper, while making a batch of clear mint, had a lapse of concentration and the product ended up cloudy. As it tasted nice, the batch was saved, so this sugar-based confection was born. Since then, Kendal Mint Cake recipe has become the no1 favourite with hikers, climbers and visitors to the Lake District. Throughout Cumbria, Mint Cake is widely available through camping and outdoor equipment shops. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Kendal -Lancaster Canal

Kendal Canal – the Black and White Canal

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Kendal  – Lancaster Canal: The Kendal canal was opened in 1819 as an extension to the Preston to Lancaster canal. The canal’s main purpose was to transport coal north from the Lancashire Coalfields, and limestone south from Cumbria. Due to the nature of these cargoes the waterway was given a local nickname – the Black and White Canal. By providing cheap coal to replace water power with steam power it enabled Kendal’s manufacturing industry to expand. However, with the coming of the railways in 1840, the canal began a decline and by 1955 was deemed commercially unviable. A final nail in the canal’s coffin was in the in the 1960’s, when the M6 motorway was built, cutting off the northern reaches at Tewitfield, leaving the canal to deteriorate. The section from Stainton to Kendal was closed down and the last two miles were filled in. On a more positive note, the route of the canal south of Kendal is still evident with most of the bridges still in place. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside

A Beautiful Arnside Sunset

Reading Time: < 1 minute Sundown in Arnside: Arnside is a wonderful place for an evening stroll. The sunsets are spectacular with amazing views over the Kent estuary towards the  Lake District.  There’s nothing quite like watching the sun go down and listening to the curlews and oystercatchers pottering along the shoreline. The village is located within a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Undoubtedly, Arnside is one of England’s best kept secrets. Arnside was once a thriving fishing port when shrimps were plentiful in Morecambe bay. The fishing industry faded when the railway arrived and the early Victorians made the village a seaside resort. For further information on Arnside click here. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Windermere’s Brand New MV Swift

Reading Time: < 1 minute Windermere’s Brand New MV Swift took to the waters of Windermere recently. Windermere Lake Cruises’ brand-new 300-seat MV Swift embarked on its maiden voyage last Sunday October 25th 2020. The boat is smaller than other boats in their fleet and is fully accessible for disable passengers. The vessel was built at Lakeside and after being inspected by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and granted a Passenger Certificate ready for service. The launch of this new boat has come at a time of significant uncertainty in the tourism industry. Undoubtedly, the MV Swift has a bright future on the lake and will play a significant role in helping the economic recovery post the Coronavirus pandemic. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Tour of Britain Cycling Returns to Cumbria

Tour of Britain 2021 – The Tour Returns to Cumbria

Reading Time: < 1 minute Cumbria To Host Tour of Britain Stage in 2021: Cumbria will once again host a stage of UK’s elite road cycling race – the Tour of Britain 2021. The announcement that Cumbria will feature in the UK’s biggest cycle competition has been welcomed in the county. The race is set to return to the county in September 2021. Geraint Thomas As a result of the event, the county’s tourism sector will get a boost following the dreadful year we had in 2020. Originally, the race had been planned to take place for September this year but had to be postponed due to the pandemic. Having the race stage in Cumbria will shine a spotlight on the area internationally and bring with it a lot of tourism for the event. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dalton-in Furness

Ornate Cast-Iron Shop Front

Reading Time: < 1 minute Cast-Iron Shop Front in Dalton-in-Furness: Hartley’s Restaurant at 51, Market Street in Dalton-in-Furness has its own individual identity from other shops in the town. Its shop front is ornate and made of cast-iron which is unusual. The shop front will have been installed in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, being made of cast iron it allowed shopfronts to be tall and elegant for the first time. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Workcation Break in Stunning Grange-over-Sands

Reading Time: < 1 minute Working Remotely on Holiday: Enjoy a Workcation break in stunning Grange-over-Sands, Cumbria: Are you working from home and tired of the same four walls? Here at Lothlorien we would like to offer you a change of scenery for your home working regime with a workcation. In other words, having a holiday and still being able to keep working remotely. With free fibre broadband WIFI, you can enjoy a break away from home whilst continuing to work seamlessly and still be productive. Contact us at Lothlorien and speak to us about your requirements. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Storrs Temple of Naval Heroes

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Temple of Naval Heroes: Storrs Temple is also known as ‘Temple of Naval Heroes’. It sits at the end of a stone causeway leading from the grounds of Storrs Hall out into Windermere. Providing glorious views up and down the lake, the temple was constructed by Sir John Legard of Storrs Hall. It is as a folly to the house he had built in the latter years of the eighteenth century. As an expression of his patriotism, Sir John requested that the octagonal building carried the names of four great naval heroes in the ongoing war against the French. As a result, the folly is decorated with four engraved stone slabs which read: Howe, St Vincent, Duncan and Nelson. He travelled extensively in Europe, but in later life suffered ill-health, including a condition which left him unable to walk. Hell-bent on enjoying an outdoor life, he moved to the beautiful shores of Windermere where he continued his passion for sailing. Indeed, Sir John played a significant role in establishing the annual regatta on Windermere in 1801. The the event remains extremely popular to this day, over two hundred years later. In his indicatively named yacht, “The Victory”, he repeatedly won against other eminent local enthusiasts. Many people said that when he dedicated Storrs Temple to the admirals he was playfully reminding his contemporaries that his prowess on the lake was equal to the mastery of the Royal Navy at sea. Sir John’s health deteriorated and he was forced to vacate Storrs Hall only a few years later. Nevertheless, subsequent proprietors continued to value the existential nature of this truly exceptional ‘Temple of Naval Heroes’. Locals and visitors to Lothlorien are strongly recommended to pay it a visit. Consequently, the last owners of Storrs Hall, by now a hotel, handed the building to the National Trust in 1965. The general public can walk through the hotel grounds and out to visit the temple. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Ashness Bridge

Lake District – No1 In The UK

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Lake District – UK’s No 1 Top Place to Go: The Lake District has been named the UK’s top destination on Lonely Planet’s new international ‘Ultimate Travel List’. The prestigious international travel guide has ranked hundreds of what it calls “unmissable global travel experiences” around the world. The Lake District came top of the UK list along with Hadrian’s Wall who came in at number 13th most essential destination. Acknowledgement of both of Cumbria’s World Heritage Site speaks volumes for the region. Furthermore, the Lake District boasts the highest number of Michelin stars anywhere north of London – making Cumbria a true food-lovers paradise. With Cumbria’s wide-open spaces providing the perfect environment for a visit based around relaxation, health and wellbeing. Additionally, the county has a lively, vibrant culture and arts sector made famous by the famous Lake District writers such as Beatrix Potter and William Wordsworth. The Lake District is also home to the deepest lake and highest mountain in England. The whole area gives endless opportunities for adventure and fun in the great outdoors.

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Gummers How

Gummers How – Environmental Stewardship Scheme

Reading Time: < 1 minute Stunning Gummers How:  Gummers How is locally and nationally known for its stunning walks and wonderful views. On a clear day, you can see all along Winderemere, from Newby Bridge to Ambleside. Recently, the land has been singled out as an area of habitat importance. Management responsibility for the land is undertaken through the Higher Level Environmental Stewardship Scheme. The scheme is designed to preserve and enhance the important ecological value of the upland vegetation on the fell. For the same reason, hardy Luing cattle have been introduced to Gummers How to assist vegetation management designed to encourage the important shrub and flower habitat once abundant on this fell. On top of that,, Luing cattle have been selected for their special characteristics adapted to survive on rugged hill ground. Secondly, this hardy breed evolved on the island of Luing in Argyle off the west coast of Scotland. It is a cross between Highland cattle selected for its ruggedness and hardiness, and Shorthorn, for their beef qualities. As a result, the cattle have the best qualities from both breeds. To conclude, Gummers How is 8 miles away from Lothlorien and is easily reached by car in less than 20 minutes. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lake District Wild Swimming

Lake District – Wild Swimming

Reading Time: 2 minutes Lake District – Wild Swimming: Love Wild Swimming? Have you ever thought about dipping your toes (and hopefully the rest of you) into a cool, sparkling lake or tarn? Wild swimming is becoming ever more popular, so what makes people take a plunge into a cold, wet lake? For a start the water is a breath-taking refreshment to your body, the view is completely different from down below the bank and after the shock of the cold water it galvanises the heart. Cumbrian lakes are now cleaner, safer and more accessible than at any time in living memory and the health benefits of a wild swim or a natural dip are well publicised. Take proper precautions and wild swimming can be a safe and fun way to enjoy the outdoors. On a warm, calm day wild swimming is a really special experience. So, stay safe and the shimmering waters will reconnect you with the natural world around you. A couple of great wild swimming places in the Lake District are: 1) Grisedale Tarn Set in Grisedale Hause in a gap in the Helvellyn range, between the valleys of Thirlmere and Ullswater, Grisedale tarn is a perfect place for high, wild plunge. It has gently shelved banks and some useful flat boulders for ease of access and sunbathing. 2) Derwentwater Derwentwater is one of the finest swimming lakes in the Lake District. It is three miles long and surrounded by dramatic, rugged mountains. It is surreal looking up at the scenery when you are in the water swimming between the little islands. 3) Rydal Water Rydal water is one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District. It is ideal for open-water swimming. Walking along a tranquil stretch of river, lined with overhanging trees, tall rushes and water lilies. The clear water reveals and undiscovered world of aquatic plants and shoals of tiny silver fish slither between the rocks. Natural rises and drops of the river bed reveal the changing topography of the river floor Further information on the best wild swimming click here: https://www.swimthelakes.co.uk/   Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Grange-over-Sands Staycation

Stunning Grange-over-Sands Staycation

Reading Time: < 1 minute Holiday rental in Grange-over-Sands: Whether you like exploring, rambling or simply relaxing, Lothlorien holiday rental in Grange-over-Sands is a perfect choice for your staycation. Set on the edge of Morecambe bay it is within easy reach of the Lake District. In fact, the southern end of Windermere is less than 8 miles away at Newby Bridge.  Lothlorien boasts bay views, a large enclosed garden, off-road parking and free fibre broadband. We are pet and dog friendly and welcome well-behaved pets. What more do you need to have a relaxing break in this beautiful part of the country? Check availability and prices below.   Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Chapel Island near Ulverston

Cross-Bay Walk to Chapel Island

Reading Time: < 1 minute Cross-Bay Walk to Chapel Island: We have enjoyed a lovely walk out onto Morecambe Bay today to visit Chapel Island. Chapel Island looks mysterious sitting off the coast of Ulverston in the Levens Estuary. The Island is a short distance from the shore and separated by the River Leven. Great care must be taken when planning a visit. Check the tide times before venturing out onto the sands. When you reach the Island you can see the ruins of an ancient chapel built by Cistercian monks from nearby Conishead Priory around the 14th century. The island is currently uninhabited but there has been fisherman’s cottage there at one time. From the archives the census for 1851 and 1861 shows people actually living there. The purpose of the chapel was to provide shelter for travellers and fishermen trying to negotiate the treacherous sands. However, as always on the bay, there is a permanent danger from strong currents and quicksands.  The Island lies on the path of the ancient crossing from Cartmel to Conishead. It would have been a place of haven to travellers caught out by the tide. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Nine Standards Rigg

Nine Standards Rigg

Reading Time: < 1 minute Nine Standards Rigg is a collection of large cairns sitting high on the fell above Kirkby Stephen. It’s believed the cairns have stood on this site for over 800 years. Furthermore, there is evidence there may have been as many as 13 cairns at one time. The Coast to Coast walk made famous by Alfred Wainwright runs over the summit where walkers can enjoy panoramic views across the Eden Valley. The walk from the centre of Kirkby Stephen takes about an hour to the summit.  Although the summit is within Cumbria the Nine Standards Rigg lies within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Hazelmere Cafe

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Hazelmere cafe is situated on Yewbarrow Terrace opposite the duck pond in Grange-over-Sands. The cafe is an independent, family run business and has been owned by the Stubleys family for nearly 40 years.  They aim to use local food and suppliers wherever possible. Everything they make to serve is made on the premises by their extensive team of chefs and bakers. Furthermore, baking continues throughout the night to ensure freshness. Their popular artisan breads are being used by many local restaurants and eateries. Alongside their very busy deli, bakery and restaurant they also have an upstairs showroom and shop which houses the famous ‘Dorothys Teas’. Dorothy the owner of the whole business has travelled the world extensively searching for many of the teas that you see in our showroom shop today. The shop now boasts over 120 different teas and tisanes to choose from!  The Hazelmere has been featured in numerous national food magazines and newspapers, as well as on television. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Restaurants in Grange-over-Sands

11 Restaurants around Grange-over Sands

Reading Time: < 1 minute Eleven Great places to eat out in the Grange-over-Sands Area 11 Restaurants around Grange-over Sands   The Grange area boasts a fantastic variety of pubs, inns, restaurants, cafes and tearooms to suit all budgets and tastes.   From a Michelin starred dining experience to afternon tea, the area offers exceptional food and drink. You are never far away from one of our many independently run businesses offering delicious food and drink. Here is a sample of what’s on offer: The Estuary on Main Street, Grange-over-Sands; L’Enclume in Cartmel; At Home Cafe & Bistro on Main Street, Grange-over-Sands; Thyme Out Coffee House & Restaurant at Devonshire House, Grange-over-Sands; Choco-Lori of Grange – Handmade Chocolate Shop, chocolate Cafe & Bar on Main Street; The Netherwood Hotel, Lindale Road, Grange-over-Sands; The S Café on  Yewbarrow Terrace, Grange-over-Sands; The Cavendish Arms in Cartmel; Clare House, Park Road, Grange-over-Sands; The Pheasant Inn in Allithwaite; Hazelmere Café on  Yewbarrow Terrace, Grange-over-Sands; Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cartmel Bridge

New Cartmel Bridge

Reading Time: < 1 minute New Cartmel Footbridge A new footbridge has recently been installed in Cartmel. The new bridge crosses the River Eea (an ancient term for ‘water’) by the side of the Kings Arms linking it with the Rogan & Co restaurant. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dove Cottage

Dove Cottage, Grasmere – What Joy Awaits You

Reading Time: < 1 minute   Dove Cottage & Wordsworth Museum “This plot of orchard-ground is ours” Dove Cottage is the world-famous home of William and Dorothy Wordsworth. Their Grasmere home and museum is due to reopen on Saturday August 16th 2020. After several months of closure due to major restoration work, Dove Cottage will again open its doors.

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Grange - Yewbarrow Terrace

Have a Break in Grange-over-Sands

Reading Time: < 1 minute Have a relaxing break in Grange-over-Sands. If your overseas holidays are off-limits this year, look no further than a relaxing break in Grange-over-Sands. With a mile long promenade, formal flowerbeds and smart cafes, what could be more enjoyable than looking out over the vista of Morecambe Bay? Furthermore, Grange has one of the mildest climates in the north of England. There are numerous local walks from Grange including Hampsfell with its panoramic views from the hospice. The hospice is a building given by the vicar of Cartmel as a resting place for travellers.  Climb up the stone staircase for a 360-degree view from the Lake District mountains to the Isle of Man to Blackpool tower. Another favourite walk is to Humphrey Head, a striking limestone promontory jutting out into the bay. Humphrey Head is known for its important flora and fauna. It is also reputed to be where the last wolf in England was killed. If you are interested in bird watching, an estimated 200,000 birds visit the bay during the winter. Grange also has a diverse mix of independent businesses with Higginsons Butchers and Hazelmere cafe being the best known. So, for a holiday with a difference this year, have a staycation in Grange and enjoy your well-earned holiday. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Chapel House Woods

Chapel House Woods

Reading Time: < 1 minute Chapel House Woods near Staveley is on the southern edge of Windermere and covers an area of 333 hectares. Chapel House is situated within the Lake District National Park. Most of the forest was planted in the 1950’s and 1960’s mainly with spruce, larch, Scots pine and silver birch. Over the years, the woodland has been used in the manufacture of various items. Firstly, for besoms (a broom made of twigs tied together on a long handle)  Secondly, in bobbin manufacture at nearby Stott Park Finally, for producing charcoal. There are still remains of the old charcoal pits in the woods. The woodland also contains many watercourses, marshes, bogs and ponds, including Simpson Ground Reservoir, which is accessible along forest tracks. The car park is at Barrowbanks, which is 6 miles from Lothlorien.    

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The Topiary Gardens and Levens Hall

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Topiary Gardens and Levens Hall: Levens Hall is situated just off the A6 at near Levens village. The hall (with pele-tower) is the largest Elizabethan house in the Lake District. The topiary gardens are world famous in their own right and are a must for any gardener visiting the area. The hall has a fascinating history including once being gambled away in a game of cards. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lakeland Motor Museum

Lakeland Motor Museum

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Lakeland Motor Museum is a great local attraction with something for all the family. Besides being in a beautiful location, this modern state-of-the-art museum is a must for all motoring enthusiasts. Nestled in the scenic Leven Valley the museum is open to visitors seven days a week Initially, the museum opened its doors at its original site at Holker Hall in 1978. As a consequence, it has welcomed more than 1.5 million visitors. The current museum is a collection of some 30,000 exhibits collected over a period of 50 years. The collection is home to more than 150 cars and motorbikes, plus bicycles, pedal cars and other motoring related items. A recent special addition to the museum is the iconic DMC DeLorean. The instantly recognisable car with gull wing doors rolled off the production line over 40 years ago. Additionally, with its brushed stainless steel body and starring role in the Back to the Future movies this car is set to delight fans for years to come. It is fair to say that the collection will unlock nostalgic memories for everyone. Furthermore, a separate dedicated exhibition stands as a tribute to father and son, Sir Malcolm and Donald Campbell. The pair between them, captured twenty one world land and water speed records in the Bluebird series of cars and boats. Donald Campbell  tragically died on Coniston Water in January 1967, whilst attempting to break his own water speed record. Highlights include full-size replicas of the Bluebird car built in 1935, the Bluebird K4 boat, and the famous 1967 jet hydroplane, Bluebird K7. What is more, Café Ambio, is on the same site, overlooks the River Leven and is an ideal spot for something to eat or drink. Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Ulverston Canal

Ulverston Canal

Reading Time: < 1 minute Ulverston Canal is an odd waterway as it isn’t connected to the UK’s canal network. In the beginning, Ulverston grew up as a centre for leather, copper and iron ore. The  ceremony to cut the canal’s first sod took place on September 4th 1796, and all of Ulverston went wild! A procession headed by two fiddles and a bag-pipe went along to see the sod cut by Col. T Sunderland. In December 1796, England’s deepest, widest and straightest canal in the UK opened for business.  Its length is entirely straight and on a single level. Furthermore, it is a lovely place for a walk. The reward when you reach the end are fine views of the estuary and the railway viaduct. The canal, situated one and a half miles from the coast. It was completed in order to provide the town with a waterway and port. At 15 feet (4.6 m) deep and 66 feet (20 m) wide, its intention was to take very large deep-water ships. On the first day, 4 vessels including 2 brigs from London and a sloop carrying coal came up the canal and docked in the basin. The Ulverston Canal was once the starting-point for steamers to Liverpool, passenger ships to Scotland and London. Similarly, at that time, cargoes of local slate, bobbins, Coniston copper and gunpowder shipped to coastal towns around Britain. Unfortunately, the arrival of the Furness Railway in the mid-1840s scuppered the canal’s long-term profitability. The canal closed down for good in the early 20th-century. Today the canal still plays a role in the day-to-day life of the market town town of Ulverston; the towpath is a popular place to go for a stroll. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Sedbergh

Sedbergh

Reading Time: < 1 minute Sedbergh is England’s official book town which came about after the devastating foot and mouth disease in 2001. Many of the shops and cafes and even the chippy stock books of all descriptions. There is even a ‘book shelter’ in the old bus shelter. Westwood Books in the town has more than 70,000 books in stock. Located in Cumbria and in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Sedbergh is much loved for its beautiful setting in the Howgill Fells. Sedbergh sits at the confluence of for rivers – the Lune, Rawthey, Dee and Clough, which made it an ideal location for the textile industry. A remnant of the industry remains to this day in in the shape of Fairfield Mill. Fairfield Mill was rescued from closure in 2018, thanks to a huge fundraising campaign.

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The Hoad Monument – Ulverston

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Hoad monument is a memorial to Sir John Barrow who was born in Ulverston in 1795. Built in 1850 from local limestone it was funded by local subscription. The Hoad is a 100ft scale replica of the Eddystone lighthouse. Above all, it was erected to commemorate Sir John Barrow who was a seafaring explorer and founder member of the Royal Geographic Society. Finally, this 1905 photograph shows the monument keeper – John Tyson in the uniform at the foot of the monument.

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Roudsea Woods and Mosses

Roudsea Wood and Nature Reserve

Reading Time: < 1 minute Roudsea Wood and Mosses is situated just off the Leven Estuary near Greenodd. The wood is one of the Britain’s most important woodland sites. To the east of the woodlands lie the bogs of Roudsea Moss and Holker Moss. Both were formed over thousands of years due to the very high rainfall in the area. These bogs have laid down deep peat deposits below the bog surface. Development of this landscape goes back to the early eras of geological time with much of the soil formed 450 million years ago. During the ice age, when the ice sheets retreated, vegetation began to recover, eventually developing into the woodlands you see today. The influence of man has been playing its part in the development of this landscape for thousands of years. It was in the 17th and 18th centuries when Roudsea Wood began to be manged on an industrial scale. The wood produced charcoal and potash for the local gunpowder factory at Low Wood at Haverthwaite.   Check our availability Looking for accommodation? Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Frank's Bridge

Frank’s Bridge – Kirkby Stephen

Reading Time: < 1 minute Frank’s Bridge spans the river Eden at Kirkby Stephen. Built in the 17th century, the bridge was used for transporting coffins from the nearby hamlets of Winton and Hartley. Stones (at the far end of the bridge) can still be seen where the coffins could be rested on route. Legend has it that a ghost called Jangling Annas is supposed to haunt the bridge by jangling her chains. She is said to have been a prisoner at Hartley Castle who escaped in her chains and drowned in the river. Kirkby Stephen is 40 minutes by car away from Lothlorien. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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