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Cumbria's Woodland

Walk in Cumbria’s Woodland

Reading Time: < 1 minute Walk in Cumbria’s Woodland To walk in the woodlands of Cumbria, you’ll find a wealth of wonderful hidden gems in glorious landscapes. Woods offer us peace and tranquility and inspire our imagination and creativity. Furthermore, these places are rich in wildlife and support a wide variety of animals and plant life Whether the woodland is on the coast or inland amidst the Lakeland Fells, many of the woods offer fantastic walks. There is so much to see and explore, both in the woods themselves or the wider landscape. It is widely appreciated today that tree, parks and woodland are the green lungs of the urban environment. We all need a green oases to refresh the mind, body and soul. If you are interested in the birdlife or simply meandering through quaint villages there will be something to interest you. What could be nicer than bird spotting on the river estuaries and taking in the magnificent views? Here are five great woodland walks to explore at your leisure. Crag Wood at Meathop Great Knott Wood near Lakeside Sea Wood near Bardsea Dobshall Wood at Arnside. Eggerslack Wood in Grange-over-Sands   We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Barrow Dock Museum

Barrow Dock Museum

Reading Time: < 1 minute Barrow Dock Museum opened in 1994 here on this former dry dock built by the Furness Railway Company in 1872. The museum’s stunning pyramid-shaped building on a scenic channelside site that stands out above the nineteenth century dry dock. This Victorian graving dock, is an historic Grade II listed dry dock, can still be seen with the museum actually suspended right over it. The museum is on North Road in Barrow-in-Furness, close to the BAE Systems yards. Inside the museum you will find a fantastic photographic archive of maritime history that is of paramount importance. Additionally, there is an imposing and permanent exhibition ‘Shipbuilders of the World’ which includes the museum’s collection of top quality ship models. Impressively, the ship models, built by Vickers Shipyard model shop, over the many years of ship building. Each model represents a ship built in the Barrow shipyard. This area has seen significant changes with the iron and steel works demolished and replaced by the Furness College In addition, the recently built channelside walk overlooks the Walney Channel. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Appleby

Visit Ancient Appleby

Reading Time: < 1 minute Visit Ancient Appleby Tucked in the curve of the Riven Eden is the ancient market town of Appleby-in-Westmorland and is 15 miles from Penrith. It’s a sleepy, charming town, which has kept its old world charm. For several centuries, Appleby was the county town of Westmorland. With the creation of Cumbria in 1974, the name of the town changed to preserve the ancient county as a reminder to its heritage. Take a walk up the picturesque main street of Boroughgate, described as one of the finest in England. Half way up Boroughgate, you will see the attractive almshouses, known as Lady Anne’s Hospital. To this day, a trust fund set up by Lady Anne Clifford, pays for the maintenance and provides homes for 13 widows. Undoubtedly, as you wander around, you will be transported back to medieval times, with the peace and quiet of beautiful riverside walks and picnic areas. Along with the peace and quiet of Appleby, there are 147 listed buildings within one square mile. Appleby’s Norman castle stands protectively above the town with the church at the bottom. Most of the castle dates back to the 17th century when  Lady Anne Clifford restored it. Conversely, the castle has an impressive 11th-century keep. Furthermore, Appleby has links to George Washington, Earl Grey and Lady Anne Clifford. Each June, the town host the famous Appleby Horse fair, the largest horse trading fair in the world. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Allan-Bank-Grasmere

Allan Bank-National Trust

Reading Time: < 1 minute Allan Bank is a beautiful National Trust property on the edge of Grasmere. It is a former home of Canon Rawnsley who, along with Octavia Hill and Sir Robert Hunter, founded the National Trust. The property was condemned as an eyesore by William Wordsworth when it was being built.  To add more intrigue to the story, in 1808 after he had married, he and Mary moved here with their three children John, Thomas and Dora.  Additionally, also living with them were Mary’s sister Sara Hutchinson, and their literary friends Thomas de Quincey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.  They stayed here for two years during which time they had two more children, Catherine and William. They eventually moved on because the chimneys smoked too much, and they fell out with the landlord! Allan Bank is slightly different from any other National Trust property as you can sit and relax, read the papers, make a brew and generally imagine you live there. If that is not enough, the views and location are to die for.  During the 2021 pandemic, the team at Allan Bank have been tackling a longstanding woodworm problem. Woodworm has damaged the structural timbers in the cellar and ground floor. In addition, traditional lath and plaster has been used to re-build Coleridge’s bedroom ceiling. Where possible, the original timber has been salvaged and floorboards replaced in their original locations, Allan Bank is well worth a visit anytime.   We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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St Oswald’s Parish Church, Grasmere

Grasmere – St Oswald’s Church

Reading Time: < 1 minute Glories of Grasmere – St Oswald’s Church: St Oswald’s Parish Church is in the pretty village of Grasmere beside the River Rothay.  From a distance, it doesn’t look and awe-inspiring building but arts of the church date back to the 13th century. Subsequently, for hundreds of years this was the main parish church for the district. Deceased parishioners from the outlying areas, including Ambleside, Elterwater and the Langdale Valley had to be carried along a series of ‘coffin trails’ or corpse roads’ to be buried in Grasmere. Importantly, the remains of William, Mary and Dorothy Wordsworth, together with Hartley Coleridge  are buried in the graveyard. Additionally, the tombstones of the Wordsworth’s children are all situated here too. The graves are hidden away in a quiet corner of the churchyard and protected by low iron railings. As a consequence, the churchyard has become a mecca for visitors interested in the life and death of the great poet. It’s disappointing to learn that a priceless prayer book that once belonged to William Wordsworth has been stolen from the church. The prayer book, dating back to 1835, was removed from a glass cabinet from inside the church. Another interesting feature of the church is that it serves three parishes and has a separate entrance for each. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Rydal Mount

Wordsworth’s Rydal Mount

Reading Time: < 1 minute Rydal Mount was William Wordsworth’s family home for 37 years. He came to this lime-washed yeoman’s house in 1813 and lived here until his death in 1850. Here the poet composed and revised many of his poems including ‘daffodils’ which was published from here in 1815. In fact, more than half of Wordsworth’s published poetry was written at Rydal Mount. The house itself was originally a farm built in 1550; the dining room still has its early timbers and slate floor. It was enlarged around the middle of the 18th-century. Wordsworth himself was particularly attracted to the traditional style of the house with spectacular views over Rydal water and Windermere. He never owned the house but leased it from the le Flemings of nearby Rydal Hall. While living in Rydal Mount, William, Wordsworth accepted the post of Poet Laureate at the age of 73. Incidentally, in 1969, Mary Henderson, the poet’s great, great granddaughter, bought the property and opened it up to the public. The house displays family portraits, personal possessions and mementoes of a life devoted to literature and the Roamntic movement. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Yewbarrow House, Grange-over-Sands

Yewbarrow House – Grange-over-Sands

Reading Time: 2 minutes If you are a keen gardener, don’t miss this spectacular garden at Yewbarrow House in Grange-over-Sands. Set high above the town off Hampsfell  Road, the house and gardens have spectacular view over Morecambe Bay. The gardens are set out on an exposed sloping site and you may be surprised to find exotic plants thriving so far from their native warmer climes. Unusually, here at Yewbarrow House, frost rarely penetrates the ground, allowing olive trees to bear fruitful, if not modest, crops. Much of the garden is decorative and inspirational. Additionally, the Victorian Kitchen Garden, provides fruit, vegetables and herbs, these days not just ‘for the house’, as in long gone days, but the owners neighbouring hotels. Furthermore, there is a large cutting garden with row upon row of flowers that, like the produce, are sent to the sister hotels. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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South Lakes Safari Zoo

Safari Zoo Cumbria

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Safari Zoo Cumbria, near Dalton in Furness, is Europe’s most interactive animal park. It is renowned for just how close you can get to the animals. You can feed giraffes, walk amongst and handfeed wallabies, kangaroos, and emus, walk amongst and interact with over 100 lemurs living wild in the park. Moreover, you can help feed them at 2pm during the summer season. June 2021 South Lakes Safari Zoo is welcoming a new addition to its residents and is looking forward to the future. They are thrilled to introduce to the public Mia the Raccoon. Mia came from Wiltshire College where she has lived for the past three years. In the early years, Mia was hand-reared and is  around eight years old. Additionally, you can come face to face with lions, tigers, penguins, bears hippos, rhinos and much more. Dalton in Furness is 18 miles away from Lothlorien off the A590. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lakeland Motor Museum

Step Back in Time – Lakeland Motor Museum

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Lakeland Motor Museum is a great local attraction where you can step back in time. There is something here for all the family. Besides being in a beautiful location, this modern state-of-the-art museum is a must for all motoring enthusiasts. Nestled in the scenic Leven Valley the museum is open to visitors seven days a week Initially, the museum opened its doors at its original site at Holker Hall in 1978. As a consequence, it has welcomed more than 1.5 million visitors. The current museum is a collection of some 30,000 exhibits collected over a period of 50 years. The collection is home to more than 150 cars and motorbikes, plus bicycles, pedal cars and other motoring related items. DMC DeLorean: A recent special addition to the museum is the iconic DMC DeLorean. The instantly recognisable car with gull wing doors rolled off the production line over 40 years ago. Additionally, with its brushed stainless steel body and starring role in the Back to the Future movies this car is set to delight fans for years to come. Amphicar: Similarly, the Amphicar on display is one of the most unconventional cars ever. German engineer, Hams Trippel, created the car who then marketed it as the “sports car that swims”. Built in 1966, the Amphicar has a top speed of almost 70mph on land. The four-seater convertible is easily converted into a seaworthy boat with the flick of a lever. In addition, it was then able to reach 10 knots on water. It is aided by twin propellers and using the steering wheel as a rudder. All things considered, it is hard to believe that the Amphicar is 55 years old and was clearly a car ahead of its time. It is fair to say, that the collection will unlock nostalgic memories for everyone. Tri-Van: A 1940s light delivery vehicle – known as the ‘Tri-van’ has been restored to full working order and currently takes pride of place in the museum. It was originally built by a Wolverhampton firm called Turner Manufacturing Ltd, but sold under the brand name – Light delivery Vehicles. Accordingly, the museum bought the vehicle at auction and had it restored locally. The Tri-Van was rebuilt in Greenodd and repainted in Ambleside. Peel P50: The Peel P50 is the smallest production car ever made. This three-wheeled micro-car was originally made by the Peel Engineering Company on the Isle of Man between 1962 and 1965. This small exhibit was loaned to the museum by longtime supporter Gordon Fitzgerald from Kendal who sadly died earlier this year. Donald and Malcolm Campbell: Furthermore, a separate dedicated exhibition stands as a tribute to father and son, Sir Malcolm and Donald Campbell. The pair between them, captured twenty one world land and water speed records in the Bluebird series of cars and boats. Donald Campbell tragically died on Coniston Water in January 1967, whilst attempting to break his own water speed record. Last but not least, further highlights include full-size replicas

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Warton Crag in Limestone Country

Warton Crag And Occupation Road

Reading Time: 2 minutes Warton Crag and Occupation Road: Warton Crag is a glorious limestone cliff situated in Warton near Carnforth. It is the most southerly of the wooded limestone hills typical of the area. The area is rich in rare flora and fauna making it a Site of Special Scientific interest (SSS). Some of the plants and colourful flowers growing in and around the limestone include: Purple orchids; Rock rose; Horseshoe vetch; Bird’s foot trefoil. At 163m (535ft) Warton Crag is the highest point in the Arnside and Silverdale area. The area is within an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The area is especially good for butterflies which include: Small tortoise shell; Peacock; Holly blue; High brown fritillary. The Warton Crag Nature Reserve is an excellent starting point to explore the area. Additionally, there is a free car park off Crag Road in Warton, Carnforth LA5 9RY. Further along Crag Road is a bridleway know as Occupation Road. The track is an old Drover’s road where cattle and other livestock were driven back in the days before refrigeration. At the time, it was the only way to ensure fresh meat was to buy it when it was still alive! The prominent limestone scars in the area are popular with rock climbers, including the crumbling main quarry. The quarry is visible for miles around (especially from the M6) as it takes an unsightly bite out of the hillside. From the summit of the crag, you will pass a beacon and a trig point where you get wonderful views over Morecambe Bay and Arnside. Looking out into the bay from the top of the crag, you are looking at the old main road across the sands. The route was, and still is, treacherous and many lives lost over the years thanks to the quick sand and even quicker tides. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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High Dam – Finsthwaite

Reading Time: < 1 minute High Dam is a picturesque tarn above Finsthwaite at the southern end of Windermere. The dam was built in the the early 1800s to supply water to the local mill. Stott Park Bobbin Mill is a close-by and provided wooden bobbins to the weaving and spinning industry. The dam is surrounded by mixed woodlands of oak, birches, larch and Scots pine to name a few. Furthermore, the woodland floor is scattered with bilberry, bracken and heather.  Scott Park bobbin mill is the only working bobbin mill left in the Lake District and is open to the public for tours.

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The Giant's Grave

St Andrew’s Church – Penrith

Reading Time: < 1 minute Here at St Andrew’s Church, Christians have worshipped here, on this site, in Penrith for over a thousand years. Additionally, there is a possibility a chapel stood here in Saxon times. Augustinian friars  served the church in 1133. The tower dates from 1397 and the the  nave and chancel built in the 1720s in the Georgian style. Outside St Andrew’s Church in Penrith are three sandstone objects known as the ‘Giants Grave’. It is believed they mark the grave of Owen Caesarious, King of Cumbria from 970 to 937. However, they are now thought to be pre-Norman and the earliest remains of Christianity in Penrith. Nearby is the ‘Giants Thumb’, an old Norse single cross dated around 920 and believed to be erected by Owen Caesarious as a memorial to his father. In 1716, the parishioners of St. Andrew’s petitioned to build a new church on the grounds that the church was in dangerous and ruinous condition. Finally, the present church was was consecrated in 1722 and is one of the finest examples of Georgian church architecture in the north of England. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Good Holiday Cottage Broadband and Wi-Fi

Grange-over-Sands Holiday Cottage Wi-Fi

Reading Time: < 1 minute Grange-over-Sands Holiday Cottage Wi-Fi When you are away from home either on holiday or working remotely, it’s important to be able to connect to the internet. Having easy and reliable access to the worldwide web is a must-have when booking a holiday let in Grange-over-Sands. Here at Lothlorien, we are aware our guests love to keep in touch with their loved ones back home. Furthermore, having a decent Wi-Fi connection on holiday allows you to stream movies, interact on social media, take part in video calls, watch television or hang out with friends.  With this in mind, we offer free superfast broadband and Wi-Fi access throughout the property. There is no need to compromise when staying at this self-catering holiday home in Grange-over-Sands. In June 2021, Openreach outlined plans to expand their ultrafast full fibre broadband and upgrade the telephone exchange in Grange-over-Sands. The plans are all part of a major connectivity upgrade across Cumbria and the North West. Stay with us here at Lothlorien in Kents Bank, and take advantage of our free broadband and Wi-Fi during your stay. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Castlehead Lindale

John Wilkinson-Ironmaster

Reading Time: 3 minutes John Wilkinson – Ironmaster: Iron-mad Wilkinson (as his contemporaries called him) was a talented engineer and pioneer in the industrial revolution. He made his fortune manufacturing cast iron and munitions. He was born in 1728, John Wilkinson helped in his father’s iron furnaces at Lindale and Backbarrow. As a young man he had grand ideas which required more powerful foundries. As the local charcoal could not fire the furnaces as fiercely as coal being used elsewhere. With his in mind, he moved to the iron making centres of the West Midlands. A pivotal moment in his story, and in British industrial history, came when steam engineer James Watt asked for Wilkinson’s help. Further lateral thinking saw him champion cast iron far and wide. This included the world’s first iron bridges, crossing the River Severn at Broseley and Ironbridge (now a World Heritage Site). Lindale: Lindale always remained special to him and he built Castle Head at near Grange over Sands as his main homes and headquarters. His first wife, Anne Maudsley, died in childbirth in 1786. He married again to Mary Lee when she was 40 but was unable to provide him with children. Concerned that he hadn’t an heir to his business empire, he and Mary came up with a plan to use another woman to procure one. A maid called Ann Lewis, had two girls to him followed (at last) by a boy when John Wilkinson was 78 years old ! Wilkinson died in 1808 a very wealthy man. His eccentric side shows in the arrangements he made at Castle Head for his own death. He laid a cast iron coffin in the garden ready for his day of reckoning. Furthermore, he constructed an iron obelisk to stand above it and composed his own epitaph. His Final Journey Home: Unfortunately, he couldn’t control what came next. He died in Bradley in Staffordshire, close to the site of his great ironworks. His executors had to undertake the difficult task of transporting his body more than 100 miles to Castle Head. His body was eventually transported on a gun carriage in a lead coffin encased with wood. The coffin was on the road to its final destination for 4 days. It was pulled behind two horses and in the charge of two men. It is believed that once the carriage reached Lancaster, the men decided to take the shorter, direct route to Lindale over the sands. Unfortunately, the men didn’t check the tide times, and just short of Castle Head shore, found themselves being outrun by the incoming tide. Realising the danger the men were in they uncoupled the gun carriage and climbed onto the backs of the horses and raced to safety. On reaching the shore they watched in horror as the tide swamped the gun carriage. The coffin was tipped over and moment later it sank below the waves. It was later that evening when they reached the mourners waiting at Castle Head to tell them the dismal

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Levens Hall and Gardens

Levens Hall and Gardens

Reading Time: < 1 minute Levens Hall is an Elizabethan house approximately 11 miles east of Lothlorien – close to Kendal. The magnificent mansion was built around a 13 Century pele tower. Due to its considerable age, structural repairs to the leaking roof at the north tower are currently underway. Additionally, the hall has fine panelling, plasterwork and Jacobean furniture and fine paintings. Outdoors, you can visit the world famous 17th Century topiary garden, created by Monsieur Beaumont. The gardens, laid out in the 1690s, retain much of the original spirit, including more than 100 pieces of enormous quirky topiary – some dating back to the original plantings. Topiary Day: World Topiary Day will provide visitors to Levens Hall with an opportunity to explore over 100 pieces of topiary, with the help of head gardener, Chris Crowder. The event takes place this year on May 12th.  We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Ulverston Canal

Ulverston Canal

Reading Time: 2 minutes Ulverston Canal is a quirky waterway as it isn’t connected to the UK’s canal network. It is just over a mile long, and straight as an arrow and on a single level. In the beginning, Ulverston grew up as a centre for leather, copper and iron ore. The ceremony to cut the canal’s first sod took place on September 4th 1796, and all of Ulverston went wild! A procession headed by two fiddles and a bag-pipe went along to see the sod cut by Col. T Sunderland. Consequently, in December 1796, England’s deepest, widest and straightest canal in the UK opened for business.  Furthermore, for leisure purposes, it is a lovely place for a walk. Families, and dog walkers alike enjoy the peace and tranquility the canal and towpath brings. The reward when you reach the end are fine views of the estuary and the railway viaduct. The canal is actually situated one and a half miles from the coast. On completion it provide the town with a waterway and port. At 15 feet (4.6 m) deep and 66 feet (20 m) wide, its intention was to take very large deep-water ships. In its heyday, it was taking 400 tons, laden with iron ore, slate, stone and gunpowder. On the first day, 4 vessels including 2 brigs from London and a sloop carrying coal came up the canal and docked in the basin. The Ulverston Canal was once the starting-point for steamers to Liverpool, passenger ships to Scotland and London. Similarly, at that time, cargoes of local slate, bobbins, Coniston copper and gunpowder shipped to coastal towns around Britain. Unfortunately, the arrival of the Furness Railway in the mid-1840s scuppered the canal’s long-term profitability. The canal closed down for good in the early 20th-century. However, today, the canal still plays a role in the day-to-day life of the market town of Ulverston; as mentioned earlier, the towpath is a popular place to go for a stroll. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Brown Robin Views

Brown Robin Nature Reserve

Reading Time: < 1 minute Brown Robin is a nature reserve close to Grange-over-Sands and Lindale. The reserve is rich I wildlife and is evenly split between grassland and woodland. The woods are most spectacular in spring when bluebells, wild daffodils, primroses and wild garlic carpet the floor. Additionally, Hart’s tongue fern and dog’s mercury grow here. Interest is amplified by the mosaic of habitats that make up this site – from sunny open grassland to deep shady wood. Furthermore, there are a number of great picnic spots and look out for the wildlife including roe deer, woodpeckers and buzzards. The underlying limestone bedrock has produced a distinctive mix of dominant ash, hazel and yew with oak, beech, sycamore and elm. Walking is fairly easy and the paths which range from farm tracks to narrow winding woodland. The routes lead to the top of the reserve where you can enjoy panoramic views across Morecambe Bay. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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The Cross Keys Milnthorpe

Milnthorpe

Reading Time: < 1 minute Milnthorpe is probably not the first place to go to when visiting the South Lakes. It is only seven miles south of Kendal and Milnthorpe. However, It has a lot to offer as this ancient market town has history, old limestone buildings and narrow lanes. The Market Square is bordered on three sides by pretty cottages and shops. Additionally, the fourth side opens out onto green lawns and trees leading up to the 19th-century church of St Thomas. The Market Cross dates back to the 17th Century and in times past used as a whipping post and a stocks for criminals! The town has always been stop-off point on the A6 for vehicles on their way to the Lake District. The Cross Keys Hotel was once a main stagecoach inn. A little known fact is the traffic lights on the junction had the first traffic lights in Westmorland in 1938. Additionally, just out of the town up on St Anthony’s Hill is a round grey tower believed to be an early 19th century folly. In World War II it came into good use as an observation post manned by the Home Guard. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Meathop Moss

Meathop Moss Nature Reserve

Reading Time: < 1 minute Meathop Moss Nature Reserve is a prized peatland, recognisde for its important species diversity. In recent times it has been slightly overshadowed by a larger near neighbour in Foulshaw Moss. However, this shouldn’t distract from its importance and history. Meathop moss started forming 5000 years ago. Following the last ice age most of the low lying area would have been a huge wetland extending for 7 miles. It was such difficult terrain to cross that people had to use an alternative and equally treacherous route across the sands to traverse this corner of Morecambe Bay. Much of this huge wetland has since been lost to agriculture and peat cutting. As a result, Meathop Moss Nature Reserve is now one of the few isolated fragments of this wildlife-rich habitat. Moreover, it is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. In 2020, the reserve saw a milestone clocking up 100 years as a nature reserve. Consequently, Meathop Moss is known as a ‘Rothschild Reserve’. It is managed and maintained by Cumbria Wildlife Trust. It is one of 284 places on a list produced by Charles Rothschild in 1915, which identified sites as ‘worthy of preservation’. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Orrest Head

Alfred Wainwright- A Lakeland Legend

Reading Time: < 1 minute Alfred Wainwright-A Lakeland Legend: In June 1930, a 23-year old Blackburn man strolled up Orrest Head near Windermere. At the top, he caught the first view of the Lake District and ignited a love affair that lasted the rest of his life. This love affair resulted in a seven-volume masterpiece: ‘A pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells’. Alfred Wainwright began writing in 1952, a year after the Lake District became Britain’s second national park. He devoted 13 years to his project, producing one page every evening after his day job as Kendal Borough Treasurer. Each guidebook is detailed with pen and ink drawings of the fells and footpaths, with handwritten descriptions of different routes. All in all, Wainwright charted 214 fells – now known as the Wainwrights. He chose Haystacks near Buttermere as his final resting place.  He described Innominate Tarn sitting on the top of Haystacks as ‘a quiet place, a lonely place’. Betty McNally, his second wife, scattered his ashes there in 1991. In ‘Memories of a Fellwanderer’ he wrote of his intention? ‘And if you, dear reader, should get a bit of grit in your boot as you are crossing haystacks in the years to come, please treat it with respect. It might be me.’ We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Picklefoot Spring Grange

Ornamental Gardens With An Intriguing History?

Reading Time: 2 minutes Ornamental Gardens – An Intriguing History? Most visitors to Grange-Over-Sands will have admired the ornamental gardens. Coupled with an expansive pond which forms the beautiful Victorian vista with a fountain at its heart. There is an unusual wildfowl population as well as unique shrub borders and unrivalled evergreens. However, few people, even a large proportion of the locals, will not know the historical significance of what is actually called Picklefoot Spring. It takes its name from walnut pickers who lived in Main Street and who specialised in pickling their harvest. It is both a natural spring and Grange’s most prolific natural well. Furthermore, an estimated 60 gallons of crystal-clear water flow into the duck pond every minute. Intriguingly, historical records reveal that this remarkable spring has never run dry. In 1945, a serious drought affected Grange when its main reservoir emptied. This event lead to the erection of a pumping station nearby to supply townsfolk with drinking water. Sure enough, Picklefoot lived up to its reputation and continued to flow. The door behind the duck hut conceals the pump for the fountain, as well as the sump linked to the pond from which the pump draws its water. The fountain switches off when the pond level is lowered before heavy rain or high tides and the pond acts as an overflow reservoir. Pickled walnuts have been a delicacy in England since at least the early 1700’s and mentioned in many literary works. In ‘The Pickwick Papers’, published in 1836 by Charles Dickens, chapter 49 reads, “—the first faint glimmerings of returning animation, were his jumping up in bed, bursting out into a loud laugh, kissing the young woman who held the basin, and demanding a mutton chop and a pickled walnut.” The Compleat Housewife (1727) gives a recipe for “Another Way to pickle Walnuts”. Similarly, Evelyn Waugh mentions them in Brideshead Revisited, published in 1945. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Hampsfell

5 Must-Do Walks in the Grange Area

Reading Time: 2 minutes 5 Must-Do Walks in the Grange Area: Hampsfell: Is a modest hill rising above Grange, is a popular half-day walk for visitors. There are many routes to the summit and I have selected one that goes up through woodland at a fairly easy angle on a good path and descends first on a wide, grassy track and then on a largely unsurfaced farm track. There are few stiles and outstanding views of the Lakeland fells from the summit. Morecambe Bay and the Lancashire coast are in view for much of the way down, making this a memorable walk for such a low hill. The town is not short of excellent cafes and pubs and may be reached by bus and rail. Although Hampsfell is well-signposted on lower ground, the open summit plateau has many paths and no signs. As the hospice is not visible until you are near it. Arnside Knott: Is owned and managed by the National Trust, is one of the best sites in Britain to see butterflies, especially in June and July. Rare species such as the High Brown Fritillary and Scotch Argus can be found here. The views north across the Kent Estuary to the Lake District fells and out into Morecambe Bay are unsurpassed. Visit Heathwaite for spectacular displays of wildflowers, in particular Cowslips and Early Purple Orchids in spring. Whitbarrow: Situated on the south eastern edge of the Lake District National Park, is home to open grassland, limestone pavement and ancient woodland. Visit in spring for the chance of seeing colourful wildflowers and two of the UK’s rarest butterflies:the high brown and pearl-bordered fritillaries. Scout Scar: A delightful easy circular walk offering wonderful views of the Lakeland Fells on Scout Scar near Kendal. From a small car park next to the Scar the path leads up on to the Scar itself. Pass by the ‘viewpoint mushroom’ which includes an indicator showing all the Lakeland Fells that can be seen from this point. Continue along the mainly flat scar and then return via a parallel path on the far side of the mushroom. The walk can easily be extended further along the scar. Eggerslack Woods: Eggerslack is close the to centre of Grange-over-Sands . It is ever-changing and rich in plant, bird and insect life. Additionally, good paths lead you through predominantly mixed broadleaved woodland where you can wander between birch, ash, oak, holly rowan and yew. At the bottom of the wood is a peaceful, shady hazel coppice. Along the path, the wood opens out and the sun can slip through the canopy of ash and sycamore revealing dog’s mercury and ferns. Equally, higher up on the hill, limestone outcrops support common dog violet, bluebell and woodrush. At the very top, open grassland makes a wonderful picnic spot with panoramic views across Morecambe Bay. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Laurel and Hardy - Ulverston

Stan Laurel – Ulverston

Reading Time: < 1 minute Stan’s Home: Stan Laurel was born in Ulverston, Cumbria on 16th June 1890 at his grand parents’ house at 3 Argyle Street. The property is still there to this day and proudly displays a plaque at the front stating the fact that Stan was born there. In April 2021, the property was put up for sale by the owner. Furthermore, the family would like to property to be bought by a fan of the comedy legend. Visitors travel from around the world to see the three-bedroom terraced property, including two visits from Stan’s daughter, Lois, from America. Stan died in in 1965 aged 74 and his ashes interred at Los Angeles cemetery. Stan and Ollie’s Statue: This bronze statue of Stan and Ollie takes pride of place outside the Coronation Hall in the town. Now that the dark nights are here, the statue looks wonderful illuminated by the gas lamp. Laurel and Hardy Museum: Close by in Brogden Street is the Laurel and Hardy Museum. Here you can browse an eccentric showcase of hat, beer bottles, props, photos and press cuttings of the pair. There is also a constant screening of Laurel and Hardy films in the 1920s-style cinema. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Foulshaw Moss Nature Reservee

Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve

Reading Time: 2 minutes Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve near Grange-over-Sands. Each year a pair of breeding Ospreys return to South Cumbria to raise their chicks. So far, they have raised 18 chicks since 2014. Last Friday, they returned again and hopefully they will be successful this year. During the 18th Century, due to persecution from taxidermists, egg collectors and considered vermin by some, breeding ospreys almost became extinct. They slowly began to re-establish themselves naturally during the 1850s in Scotland. Consequently, it was a very slow process in expanding to new areas outside Scotland due to their preference of returning to breed close to where they fledged. In England, it was a different story completely as no ospreys had called the country home for decades. Nonetheless, conservationists set about restoring their natural habitat including building nesting platforms around wetlands such as Foulshaw Moss. The platforms had to be built to make them look as authentic as possible as ospreys preference is to use a pre-used nest. Due to the wonderful work of the Cumbria Wildlife Trust, a pair of ospreys have returned to Foulshaw Moss Nature Reserve since 2014 and have so far successfully raised 18 chicks. The pair of ospreys are called White YW and Blue 35. Update 2021: The pair have returned again. It has been announced that Blue 35  has laid her first egg of the year.  Ospreys tend to lay a clutch of two to three eggs, sometimes (but rarely four), at two-or three-day intervals. You can watch the Ospreys on the Foulshaw Moss webcam here: https://www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife/cams/osprey-cam We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dove Cottage

I wandered lonely as a cloud

Reading Time: 2 minutes I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud: Come and ‘wander lonely as a cloud’ and explore Cumbria’s literary heritage with a stay Lothlorien. From your base in Kents Bank, just outside Grange-over-Sands, you can easily visit the homes of some of the country’s most celebrated writers. In less than an hour, you can visit Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top, William Wordsworth’s Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage and John Ruskin’s Brantwood (below). In addition, whilst you’re on the east side of Coniston you can connect with another famous author from the area – Arthur Ransome. Furthermore, visiting these literary hot spots, you can also take in the beauty of the lakes such as: Windermere Windermere is not only the largest lake in England it is also one of the most beautiful. The shores of the southern reaches are wooded with hardwoods. Dominating the northern reaches are the imposing craggy mountains of the central lakes. Coniston Coniston village has almost as dramatic setting as Keswick. It is beautifully placed at the foot of the Old Man and Yewdale Crags and half a mile from the head of the lake.  There are mines and quarries almost the whole way up the Old Man of Coniston. Coniston Lake is a little over 5 miles long. Rydal Water Rydal is a modest little lake set in reeds between the crags of Nab Scar to the north and Loughrigg Fell to the south. The lake is only 17m. deep and is the first lake to freeze over in a cold spell. For the most part, well-maintained lake-side paths take you around the lake to Loughrigg Terrace above Grasmere lake. Grasmere Grasmere is a combination of lake, small dale and village and thought to be quintessence of a typical Lakeland landscape. The mountain outline is exactly the same as the one the Wordsworth’s would have seen. It simply hasn’t changed at all in over 200 years. In particular, William Wordsworth loved it so much he made the village his home. Additionally, this delightful lake is completely surrounded by public access land owned by the National Trust. The walk around Rydal Water and Grasmere lake are one of the most trodden in the Lake District. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Sandscale Haws

Sandscale Haws – Roanhead

Reading Time: < 1 minute Sandscale Haws – Roanhead Sandscale Haws National Trust Reserve is an outstanding coastal dune habitat situated on the Duddon Estuary near Barrow-in-Furness. There are wonderful views overlooking the stunning Lakeland Fells. Furthermore, it is home to some unique wildlife home to a unique range of fauna. The Roanhead area is also a refuge to the rare natterjack toad where it can found in sandy places. They tend to dig burrows in soft sand dunes and breed in shallow pools. A number of characteristics differentiate the natterjack from the common toad. Notably, it is the yellow line down the middle of the natterjacks back. Additionally, the natterjack is smaller and more olive-green in colour, with shinier and smoother skin. Natterjack toads are protected in the UK under Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is illegal to disturb them or handle them without a licence. To sum up, populations are declining nationally, and beyond the north-west and Solway coasts, natterjacks cling on at just a handful of dunes in East Anglia and on sandy heaths in Surrey and Hampshire. Furthermore this stunning area is home to greater crested newts, butterflies and dune pansies. In winter it is home to thousands of migratory waders and wildfowl and the coastal habitats are of international importance for wildlife. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Donald Campbell

Donald Campbell CBE

Reading Time: < 1 minute Donald Campbell CBE The centenary of the renowned speed record breaker Donald Campbell’s birth will be on March 23rd 2021. Donald Campbell broke eight world records on water and on land in the 1950s and 1960s. Coniston played host to four of his water speed triumphs. Furthermore, he remains the only person to have set both a land and water record in the same year 1964. Campbell was awarded the CBE in 1957 for his record-breaking speed-runs. Tragically, on January 4th 1967, the 46-year old died. His boat crashed while attempting to break the 300mph barrier and his own personal water speed record. He was only 200 yards from the end of the second leg when his boat – Bluebird K7 catapulted into the air after its nose lifted on the second leg of his attempt. Consequently, it wasn’t until 2001 that his body and Bluebird were eventually found. A team led by diver Bill Smith recovered the wreckage. He was laid to rest in Coniston cemetery. He was posthumously awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct in 1967. As a result of his exploits, Donald Malcom Campbell is known as Coniston’s adopted son. To celebrate his centenary, a year-long programme of events around the Coniston area are planned. Furthermore, to start with, a pair of fighter planes paid tribute on March 23rd 2021 by flying over Coniston and dipping in salute as they roared overhead. The RAF Hawks were replicating a manoeuvre carried out by a Vulcan bomber on the day after his death in 1967. Finally, Coniston is, and will always be, Donald Campbell’s spititual home. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Priest Skear

Priest Skear-Morecambe Bay

Reading Time: < 1 minute Priest Skear-Morecambe Bay: Close to the shore in Morecambe Bay near between Bolton-le-Sands and Hest Bank is a sandbank known as Priest Skear. Priest Skear is visible with the naked eye from the shore. The origin of the name comes from the monks who would walk across the bay to Cartmel and Furness Abbey who used it as a landmark and a resting place. ‘Skear’ comes from Old Norse meaning rock in the sea or bank of stones at sea which are visible at low tide. Priest Skear was at the centre of the cockle picking disaster in 2004 when 23 Chinese cockle-pickers drowned. They were out on the sands at night when the tide came in. Only one person survived called Li Hua. He managed to reach Priest Skear after trying to save his friend and was spotted by the rescue helicopter. A lifeboat picked him up shortly after. The Praying Shell is a sculpture that overlooks Priest Skear. It is a memorial to the tragedy and a reminder just how dangerous the sands of Morecambe Bay can be. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Dog Friendly Cottage

Grange Dog Friendly Holiday Cottage

Reading Time: < 1 minute Grange Dog Friendly Holiday Cottage: Dogs love Cumbria so don’t leave your four-legged friend at home. There is so much to see and do in Grange-over-Sands and Cartmel. Furthermore, the Lake District  (right on our doorstep) is a perfect place to get outdoors and explore this beautiful area with your best friend. Here at Lothlorien we are pet friendly and love well-behaved pets. We have a large enclosed garden and plenty of super walks in the area. You’d be ‘barking’ to miss out on a break in this special place. Click below to book your stay.    We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Piel Island

Piel Island – Cumbria

Reading Time: < 1 minute Piel Island – Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria: This quiet and seemingly remote island is about a mile off the shore of Walney Island close to Barrow in Furness. The island was once under the control of the monks of nearby Furness Abbey. This 52-acre stretch of shingle beach and wildflower scrubland is without electricity and only one permanent resident, the ‘King’ of Piel. Steve Chattaway, who is the retiring landlord of the 17th-century Ship Inn, became King in a crowning ceremony in July 2008. Bestowing the ‘King of Piel’ is a tradition handed down over the centuries. The new ‘Kings’ ceremony involves being sworn in. The ‘king’ sits in the ancient carved wooden throne, wearing a helmet and holding a sword. In addition, alcohol is then poured over their head. This fascinating island also boasts a ruined 14th-century castle and camp site. If you visit with children you can spend many happy hours playing on the beach or collecting shells. Additionally, you can try to spot seals at the water’s edge. At low tide, you can walk out to Piel Island from Walney or catch the Piel Island ferry from Roa Island. Incidentally, the ferry price is reasonable (at around five pounds each) and takes a few minutes to cross the Piel Channel. Finally, if you drive along the scenic coast road from Ulverston, you will experience the beauty of the Furness peninsula. In May 2021, the Piel community is looking for a new landlord for the island’s only pub, the Ship Inn. The role of landlord is a unique, once-in-a-lifetime experience. There is so much more to the island than just running the pub! We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside Viaduct - Spectacular Engineering

Arnside Viaduct – Spectacular Engineering

Reading Time: < 1 minute Arnside Viaduct – Spectacular Engineering: Arnside Viaduct was built in 1857 across the Kent Estuary linking the Furness Railway to Barrow-in-Furness (then a new iron town), with the main London line at Carnforth junction. Additionally, in 1876, a branch line opened going eastwards to Sandside, Heversham and Hincaster. The majority of the branch line closed in 1942. The viaduct has a total of 50 piers, and is 522 yards long. By building the viaduct, it barred access to Westmorland’s only seaport close to Milnthorpe. The port area was at Sandside, roughly a mile from Milnthorpe.   Sandside had its own customs officer who saw that taxes were paid on any imported goods. Today, the only evidence of the port is a little piece of wharf now used as a car park. Consequently, the land around the Kingfisher restaurant up to the Ship Inn would likely have been used by the port’s merchants.   At one time there were ten pubs in the Sandside area and the place had a reputation for being rough. Coal was a major import into the port. Furthermore in Milnthorpe, had a wine merchant’s with premises in the square where the Spar shop once was. In addition, the east-west road through Milnthorpe to Crooklands would have been a lot busier back with merchants. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Charcoal Man Sculpture

Charcoal Man Sculpture

Reading Time: < 1 minute Charcoal Man Sculpture: This beautiful sculpture sits in the woods near High Dam, near Finsthwaite in Cumbria. The charcoal man sculpture commemorates the charcoal burning industry carried out in the wood since the building of Furness Abbey in the 12th century. Charcoal was a vital component in the iron smelting process. The sculpture sits within the remains of a bark peelers hut. Bark, particularly oak, has been used for centuries in leather tanning. Bark peelers constructed tepee like huts on a circular stone wall with a chimney at the back. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Walney Channel

Walney Channel and Bridge

Reading Time: < 1 minute Walney Channel and Bridge: For those who don’t know the Furness Peninsula, Walney  Channel separates Barrow-in-Furness from Walney Island. Walney Island protects Barrow itself from the ravages of the sea. The island itself has three villages – Biggar, North Town and Vickerstown. The River Duddon flows from the north into the channel from the Estuary and south out into Morecambe Bay. However, the channel needs to be regularly dredged to give shipping access to the Port of Barrow. The Channel Bridge In 1908, due to the expanding population of Walney, a bridge was constructed. Initially, it operated as a toll bridge and later renamed Jubilee Bridge in 1935. The bridge replaced the steam ferry which started service on May 27th 1878. In particular, it had to be an opening bridge to allow the passage of shipping up the channel to some of the docks. The bridge opened on July 30th 1908 at a cost of £175,000. As earlier mentioned, the functioned on a toll basis until 1935. Above is the original ferry crossing point between Walney Island and the mainland that ran until the 1940s. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cycling in the Lake District

Cycling in the Lake District

Reading Time: 2 minutes Cycling in the Lake District: Cumbria and the Lake District is definitely made for cycling.. From the Morecambe Bay cycle route to more challenging off-road mountain biking to gentle country lanes that are all here on the doorstep of Lothlorien. The Grizedale and Whinlatter forests offer man-made off-road trails. Grizedale is situated between the lakes of Coniston and Windermere. The trail at Grizedale will take you through the forest by way of a winding single-track, which offers leg burning climbs and adrenalin fuelled descents. If that is not enough, there are lots of rewarding views and many bridleways to extend your route. Whinlatter Forest Park is close to Keswick in the north of the county. It was the Forestry Commission’s first Lake district planting in 1919, later extended to create Thornthwaite Forest. Whinlatter Forest is home to the longest purpose-built mountain bike trail in the Lake District. The forest offers stunning views, fantastic walks, exhilarating mountain biking and rare wildlife. If you prefer a longer more gentle route to appreciate the scenery, the Hadrian’s Wall UNESCO World Heritage site is further north in the county. For younger cyclists, Allithwaite (only a mile away) has its own pump track where you can cycle free of charge. The South Lakes is home to the UK’s largest cycle store (Wheelbase) nearby Kentmere near Staveley which is approximately 15 miles away. Here at Lothlorien, we offer: Free secure well-lit cycle storage for the duration of your stay. Information on local cycle trails and routes Sockets for phone or E-Bike charging Information on local attractions Bike washing facilities if required Free use of workshop if required Find out more about  a cycling holiday in Cumbria. Click here: Cycle Cumbria We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks

3 Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks

Reading Time: 2 minutes Here are 3 Stunning Lakeland Woods Walks: Cumbria contains a wealth of wonderful woods in beautiful settings. Many of these woods are Woodland Trust woods offering fantastic walks with much to see and explore, both in the woods themselves and in the wider landscape. The idea of spending time in outdoor natural spaces and a desire to experience nature could be key to improving your wellbeing. A walk in the woods is rewarding at any time of the year. 1. Grubbins Wood Grubbins Wood is a hidden gem lying close to the foreshore between Arnside and New Barns Bay. The clear uninterupted shore of the Kent Estuary, where noisy waders feast in the mud, contrasts with the shade of the ancient yew woodland. Away from the stands of yew, Lancastrian whitebeam clings to the ramparts along the shore. This incredibly rare tree, which is full of red berries in the autumn, is only found in limestone outcrops around Morecambe Bay. 2. Moss & Height Spring Wood Moss & Height Spring Wood is managed as one wood but with two distinct areas – Moss Wood and Height Spring Wood. This lush wood, divided by an old coffin road now a public byway), lies within the beautiful Rusland Valley. The flood plain of Rusland Pool has wet mosses and pastures alive with dragonflies and wild flowers. The valley sides are cloaked in ancient deciduous woodland and the views to the fells beyond are spectacular. The area has the feeling of remoteness but with the advantages of a network of footpaths, small villages, a pub and seasonal tearoom at nearby Bouth. 3. Beckmickle Ing, Staveley Beckmickle Ing is part of a well-wooded area on the east bank of the River Kent near Staveley in the Lake District National Park. The walk takes in the beauty of deciduous woodland, with riverside interest and flower-rich grassland, including part of the Dales way. There are excellent public transport links to Staveley as well as toilets and refreshments in the village. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lakes Aquarium

Watery World At Lakes Aquarium

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Watery World At Lakes Aquarium: Lakeside is 2 miles north from Newby Bridge at the southern end of  Windermere. It has a large hotel – ‘The Lakeside Hotel’ – and a   bustling railway station for the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway. It is also the most southerly terminus for the Windermere Cruise boats from Bowness and Ambleside. Furthermore, right next door to the station is the Lakes Aquarium. The aquarium explores the amazing underwater watery world, ranging from Africa through to Morecambe Bay. Additionally, along with the usual fishy inhabitants, the aquarium is home to a boa constrictor, a family of marmosets and a pair of short-clawed otters. Undoubtedly, the highlight though is the underwater tunnel. The tunnel simulates a trip deep beneath Windermere’s surface, complete with carp, char and diving ducks. Joint tickets to include a Windermere cruise or a trip on a steam train on the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway are available to purchase. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Windermere Lake Cruises

Lakeside Windermere Ferries

Reading Time: 2 minutes During the winter months at Lakeside, the boats belonging to Windermere Lake Cruises are taken out of service for their marine equivalent of an MoT. Once the boats are out of the water their hulls are power washed to remove the green algae that has accumulated over the summer months. After that, the deck boards are removed, and the vessels  made available for inspection by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Their surveyor goes over the vessels with a fine toothcomb. They check everything from the bilges and hull to the engines and steering to ensure everything is shipshape for the coming season. Carrying out the winter maintenance programme is a responsible job. The same people who sail the thousands of visitors on Windermere complete the winter maintenance. Moreover, the captains and mate engineers sail the 17 vessels through the summer months repair them in the winter. The summer months see the wearing their uniforms and winter their boilersuits. The big four -Teal, Swan, Tern and the new Swift- can only come out of the water at Lakeside near Newby Bridge. Their smaller vessels dock at the company’s Ambleside boat yard for repairs. At the moment, one of Windermere Lake Cruises’ most iconic vessels (pictured) is having a brand new bridge fitted. The current bridge has been in place for the last 30 years. Once repaired and back in the water the boats operate for 364 days a year. Only on a handful of occasions that atrocious weather makes it unsafe to sail. On average the company loses 3-4 days per year due to poor weather. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Helvellyn Landing

Helvellyn -The Sky’s Not The Limit

Reading Time: 2 minutes Helvellyn -The Sky’s Not The Limit: Helvellyn is the third-highest mountain both in England and in the Lake District. Access to it is easier than to the two higher peaks of Scafell Pike and Sca Fell. The scenery includes three deep glacial coves, including Red Tarn, and two sharp-topped ridges on the eastern side (Striding Edge and Swirral Edge). Helvellyn was one of the earliest fells to prove popular with walkers and explorers, especially in the later 18th century. Among the early visitors to Helvellyn were the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, both of whom lived nearby at one period. Most visitors enjoying a Lakeland holiday at Lothlorien will be aware of Helvellyn. However, few will know about one of the most daring and spectacular events in its history when a biplane landed on its summit in 1926. Despite attempts on the 15th and 21st of December being abandoned, a small aeroplane landed on the summit plateau of Helvellyn and took off again on the 22nd. The two-seater biplane was an Avro 585 Gosport, was flown by Bert Hinkler. He was accompanied on the flight by John F. Leeming, president of the Lancashire Aero Club. The landing on the steep slope was successful due to a strong headwind helping stop the plane extremely quickly. However, the uphill take-off was incredibly difficult and the plane nosedived off the edge of the summit with inadequate airspeed, narrowly missing the treacherous Striding Edge before returning to Manchester. Additionally, after landing the biplane, the pilot asked a witness on the ground, Professor E. R. Dodds, to sign a paper stating he witnessed the landing. Consequently, he then took off and returned to the aerodrome in Woodford. Commemorative Plaque: There is an engraved stone tablet on Helvellyn’s summit, 40 yards south of the shelter. The tablet commemorates this unprecedented and to date unrepeated publicity stunt. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Grange-over-Sands

A Grange-over-Sands Holiday?

Reading Time: 2 minutes A Grange-over-Sands Holiday? Early days Following the arrival of the railway in 1857, Grange suddenly underwent a complete transformation. Virtually overnight the area grew up from a few scattered cottages, to become one of the most popular Victorian seaside resorts of its time. Grange finds itself sheltered from the cold winds by the broad, wooded backdrop of Hampsfell. People found the mild, dry climate much to their liking. Arrival of tourism Large hotels, schools, ornamental parks and the parish church were all built during this period. Furthermore, numerous guest houses sprang up almost everywhere, in a frenzied attempt to cater for the sudden boom in mass tourism. As many as 40,000 visitors would flock to the town. Most arrived by rail, along the line considered one of the most scenic routes in Britain. The majority of visitors would come during the summer bathing season. In addition, some visitors would vary their stay to take advantage of the year round equable climate and savour the medicinal qualities of the local spring water. Mentioned in a brochure at the time, Grange was described being the ‘loveliest spot on the Lakeland Coast’. One inevitable result of the railway preceding the town is that is acted as a barrier to the sea. Moreover, the line effectively limited the growth of large scale developments that has blighted other resorts. The mile long promenade was built as an afterthought in 1902. It quickly became popular with its affinity with the open waters of Morecambe Bay. Unfortunately, not long afterwards, an accelerated process of silting up occurred out across the Sands. Due to the silting, it eventually, became too shallow for the ferries and private yachts to negotiate. The towns heyday has long since gone, but the overall effect of the water as it sweeps across the whole bay is still there. Fishing The local fishermen still continue the traditions handed down over many generations. Although the fishing industry has slowly declined over recent years, the cockles, muscles, shrimps and fluke are generally considered to be without equal. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Castle Rigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle Keswick

Reading Time: < 1 minute Castlerigg Stone Circle (also known as the Keswick Circle) is a Neolithic stone circle about 1.5 miles east of Keswick. To get there take the Penrith Road from Keswick and take the first branch road then a right up a narrow lane. It is estimated to have been built around 4,500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settled on the fertile regions fringing the Lakeland mountains. The site was carefully chosen to impress and to draw upon the natural drama provided by the surrounding fells. Additionally, it is thought the circles were probably used as places of worship. The Castlerigg circle is differently places to the other stone circles in the county. The others generally occur on high land, the Cumbria coast and the Eden Valley. Furthermore, Keswick’s circle is in the fell centre and its setting very much adds to the drama. Apparently, its tallest stones line up with the sunrise over High Rigg at Candlemass in February and with the setting sun at Skiddaw at Summer Solstice. The Castleriggs circle is slightly oval. There remain forty-eight stones, some of the quite bulky, and on the east side is an unexplained and unusual oblong ‘chamber’ within the circle. 3 more places you may like to visit nearby; Bowder Stone Millican Dalton’s Cave Ashness Bridge We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Lindale Village

Lindale

Reading Time: 2 minutes Lindale is close to the River Winster on the old Lancashire and Westmorland border. St Paul’s church along with the local pub, The Royal Oak, are situated at the top of the hill overlooking Lindale. The church was designed by the Kendal architect, George Webster (1797-1864). It is believed Lindale has had a place of worship in the village since 1577. Unfortunately, due to dwindling congregation numbers and increased maintenance costs the church has had to close. It held its final service on 25th January 2019.  Rev. George Wilson took the last service. John Wilkinson, the ironmaster, is buried in St Paul’s churchyard, in an unmarked grave; it was his fifth burial! Firstly, his coffin became lost on the sands of Morecambe Bay, but subsequently recovered. Secondly, an attempt to temporarily lay him to rest in the grounds of Castlehead, his former home, as a larger iron coffin was made – the original one was too small. Thirdly, the gravediggers hit rock, so the grave was too shallow and he was later buried deeper. Castlehead subsequently changed hands, and the new owners objected to the grave and the memorial above it. Consequently, the memorial now stands on the Lindale junction to Grange-over Sands and John Wilkinson’s final resting place was in the village churchyard. Finally, and unusually, for a village of this size, there are three large car showrooms. Hadwins Volkswagen Lake District Audi Lloyd South Lakes MINI We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cartmel Fell School And The Worn Rock Slide

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Parish Hall (pictured) on Cartmel Fell was once the school but closed in 1971 due to the falling number of pupils. Opposite the hall you will see a rock slide, warn smooth by countless children down the years (see photo below). When the school was built in 1871, it was very modern, with a high ceiling and large windows set above eye level to avoid distracting the pupils’ attention. Until the new school was built, children attended lessons in the church. To this day, in the Cowmire box pew, carved grid patterns can be seen on the seats which are probably methods of teaching children fractions. In 1971, Cartmel Fell school became unviable due to falling puypil numbers and was closed. It now used as a parish hall. It is now used for the W.I meetings, flower festivals, dances and other social activities. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Rampside Needle

Rampside Needle Lighthouse

Reading Time: < 1 minute Rampside Needle Lighthouse: This tall slim lighthouse can be found at Rampside close to Barrow-in Furness. It is locally known as the Rampside Needle and is easily seen from nearby Piel Island. Built in the 1875, it is the only surviving example of 13 such beacons erected around Barrow to guide vessels into the port. It is 20 metres (66ft) tall and built of red and yellow bricks. This distinctive elegant landmark is set south-east of Barrow-in-Furness just off Roa Island Road. Rampside Lighthouse is Grade II designated building by English Heritage. Incidentally, for visitors who want to get out to sea, the hugely popular Piel Island ferry service operates close-by. Services to the island have started again following the Covid-19 pandemic. The prospect of seeing seals just a few metres away from the boat makes the trips very popular with families. Additionally, grey seals are easily spotted in the water around South Walney Nature Reserve, usually at high tide. At low tide the seals haul themselves out to ‘the spit’ at the far end of the reserve. Piel Island has one pub, a camp site and a few cottages. Interestingly, the landlord is crowned ‘King of Piel’ in a ceremony stretching back hundreds of years. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Millican Dalton's Cave

The Amazing Story of Millican Dalton

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Amazing Story of Millican Dalton: Millican Dalton was born in Nenthead, Alston, Cumberland, on 20 April 1867. He was known as the cavemand of Borrowdale. He spent his early life in the northwest of England before his family relocated to Essex. Earning a living as an insurance clerk in London, he lived in Loughton where he had a cottage. By the age of 36, gave up this existence and went to live in a cave in Borrowdale. Undoubtedly, he was decades ahead of his time, Millican Dalton – vegetarian, pacifist and teetotaller. Furthermore he  lived off his wits, surviving on a modest income as a climbing instructor. “Dalton’s Cave”, as it is known locally, is on the east face of Castle Crag. It comprises two inter-connected split-levelled caves left over from the slate quarrying industry.  He inhabited for almost fifty years. As a result, and to this day, Dalton’s legacy can be seen in the upper chamber of the cave, where he etched an epitaph into the wall… “Don’t Waste Words, Jump to Conclusions”. Whilst conducting his camping excursions he enjoyed campfire conversations and was always ready to pitch in an opinion on the great ideas of the day. Additionally, visitors often spoke of a sense of peace and relaxation after spending time with Millican. Embracing the solitude of his cave, he became attuned to the nature around him. It was during an interview with a newspaper in 1941, he commented, “Well, I don’t sleep much, and while I am awake I lie and listen and think. There’s a lot to think about just now, isn’t there? All the sounds of the nights, the roar of the mountain stream, the barking of our dogs and foxes, the cries of birds, how can I be lonely with such company?” Finally: Another interesting places to explore is the Bowder Stone. Visitors to Lothlorien are welcome to use the free WiFi to plan the best route to this fascinating location by visiting www.keswick.org We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Cartmel Gatehouse

Cartmel Gatehouse

Reading Time: < 1 minute Cartmel Gatehouse: The Gatehouse in Cartmel, near Grange-over-Sands dates back from the 14th century. Over the years, it has housed the school and for many years the local court. Following restoration in 1922, the building was gifted to the National Trust. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside’s Old Walls – 15c Pele Tower

Reading Time: < 1 minute Arnside Tower House is located over in Far Arnside and was built close to the old agricultural and fishing community. It was originally referred to as Heathwaite. The Tower is believed to date back to 1375 and was built to offer protection against Scottish raids. The building burned down in October 1602, and was subsequently rebuilt. In 1884, a hurricane blew down the south-west wall. Today the ruins of the 15th Century Pele Tower are in a sorry state. Fortunately, there is enough still standing to get an idea of the imposing structure it would have been 500 years ago. It is actually private property and illegal to enter it (not to mention quite dangerous) but you can get right up close to the outside for some nice pictures and a bit of close up investigation. If you walk a little bit down the hill, where the defensive ditches are, there is the abandoned entrance to a tunnel.    We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Kendal Mint Cake

Romney’s Kendal Mint Cake

Reading Time: < 1 minute Kendal Mint Cake: Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay ate Romney’s Kendal mint cake on the summit of Mount Everest on 29th May 1953. This being the first successful expedition to the summit. Romney’s were approached by the 1953 expedition to Everest, to see whether they could supply Mint haste. Fortunately, they had sufficient stock to meet their needs. Additionally, staff willingly gave up their sweet ration coupons to comply with the law. Sir Edmond Hilary and Sirdar Tenzing ate this Mint Cake on top of Everest as they gazed at the countryside below them. Mint Cake is made to this day in Kendal by three different companies. However, the mint cake creation was apparently an accident! A confectioner called Joseph Wiper, while making a batch of clear mint, had a lapse of concentration and the product ended up cloudy. As it tasted nice, the batch was saved, so this sugar-based confection was born. Since then, Kendal Mint Cake recipe has become the no1 favourite with hikers, climbers and visitors to the Lake District. In addition to this, in April 2021, it has been announced that Kendal Mint Cake has been named as a new flavour by English Lakes Ice Cream. The ice cream company has added Romney’s chocolate- coated Kendal Mint Cake to its luxury range of its products. Throughout Cumbria, Mint Cake is widely available through camping and outdoor equipment shops. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Kendal -Lancaster Canal

Kendal Canal – the Black and White Canal

Reading Time: < 1 minute The Kendal  – Lancaster Canal: The Kendal canal was opened in 1819 as an extension to the Preston to Lancaster canal. The canal’s main purpose was to transport coal north from the Lancashire Coalfields, and limestone south from Cumbria. Due to the nature of these cargoes the waterway was given a local nickname – the Black and White Canal. By providing cheap coal to replace water power with steam power it enabled Kendal’s manufacturing industry to expand. However, with the coming of the railways in 1840, the canal began a decline and by 1955 was deemed commercially unviable. A final nail in the canal’s coffin was in the in the 1960’s, when the M6 motorway was built, cutting off the northern reaches at Tewitfield, leaving the canal to deteriorate. The section from Stainton to Kendal was closed down and the last two miles were filled in. On a more positive note, the route of the canal south of Kendal is still evident with most of the bridges still in place. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Arnside

A Beautiful Arnside Sunset

Reading Time: < 1 minute Sundown in Arnside: Arnside is a wonderful place for an evening stroll. The sunsets are spectacular with amazing views over the Kent estuary towards the  Lake District.  There’s nothing quite like watching the sun go down and listening to the curlews and oystercatchers pottering along the shoreline. The village is located within a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Undoubtedly, Arnside is one of England’s best kept secrets. Arnside was once a thriving fishing port when shrimps were plentiful in Morecambe bay. The fishing industry faded when the railway arrived and the early Victorians made the village a seaside resort. For further information on Arnside click here. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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Windermere’s Brand New MV Swift

Reading Time: < 1 minute Windermere’s Brand New MV Swift took to the waters of Windermere recently. Windermere Lake Cruises’ brand-new 300-seat MV Swift embarked on its maiden voyage last Sunday October 25th 2020. The boat is smaller than other boats in their fleet and is fully accessible for disable passengers. The vessel was built at Lakeside and after being inspected by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and granted a Passenger Certificate ready for service. The launch of this new boat has come at a time of significant uncertainty in the tourism industry. Undoubtedly, the MV Swift has a bright future on the lake and will play a significant role in helping the economic recovery post the Coronavirus pandemic. We invite you to stay at Lothlorien Check our availability Relax and unwind. Check out our availability and book online today. Book Now

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