7 Fantastic things to do in Grange-over-Sands

7 Fantastic things to do in Grange-over-Sands

Here are 7 Fantastic things to do in Grange-over-Sands, Cumbria

1) Take a stroll along the promenade

An easy leisurely stroll

Taking a stroll along Grange’s mile-long promenade is a perfect way to get a feel of this Edwardian seaside town.

This fine promenade was built with the help of a local benefactor called Henry Porritt who proposed his grand idea and donated funds to complete his vision.

For his favour he insisted the Council built tea rooms, shelters and a bandstand with disabled access.

2) Visit Cartmel Priory

St Mary and St Michael

This beautiful 12th Century priory welcomes more than 600,000 visitors and worshippers every year.

Founded in 1189 by William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke and Regent of the Realm.

This beautiful Priory has been a place of pilgrimage for centuries.

Monastic visitors and other travellers crossing the Bay sands for the first time would have gazed in awe at the site of
Cartmel Priory as it nested in the shelter of the wooded valley below.

3) Take part in a Cross-Bay walk

Walk with a sandpilot

Taking part in a Cross-Bay walk is a must for visitors, and an exceptional way to enjoy the stunning beauty of Morecambe Bay.

Crossing the sands with an experienced and knowledgeable guide is the only safe way to traverse the ever-changing flats and channels.

Cross-Bay walks are internationally renowned for their historic value.

People have been crossing the sands with a royally-appointed guide since the 1500s.

4) Hike to Hampsfell Hospice

With amazing views 

Hampsfell stands at only 220m high, yet it boasts some of the finest views of any fell in the Lake District.

On top of Hampsfell is the Hospice. This solid stone shelter was built in 1846 by the vicar of Cartmel and is an ideal place to shelter from the inclement weather.

Above the door is a mysterious Greek inscription which apparently reads “Rosy-fingered dawn”.

Perhaps the explanation is that the Hospice faces East, directly into the rising sun.

5) Explore Holker Hall and Gardens

(pronounced ‘Hooker’)

Holker Hall has 25 acres of spectacular gardens set within 200 acres of parkland, where deer roam.

It is also the much-loved home of Lord and Lady Cavendish.

6) Take afternoon tea at Hazelmere Café and Bakery

A great British tradition

The Hazelmere Café was built in 1897 and has traded as a café and “refreshment rooms”
ever since.

The Stubley family bought the café in 1984 and then the adjoining shop in 1987.

Having featured in numerous food magazines and newspapers as well as on television, the Hazelmere is all about real food created and served by people who are passionate about what they do.

You can enjoy traditional waitress service in the relaxed light-filled café, or sit outside on the terrace during the summer months.

7) Visit Lakeland Motor Museum

Road transport through the twentieth century

This museum is oozing in nostalgia with a unique collection of some 30,000 exhibits, collected over a period of almost 50 years.

The Motor Museum houses a range of classic cars, motorcycles, bicycles and pedal cars, as well as memorabilia dedicated to Sir Malcolm Campbell, the famous racing driver and motoring journalist.

The museum is fully DDA compliant and is set in a beautiful riverside setting in the River Leven.

https://www.lakelandmotormuseum.co.uk/